Episcopalians in Honduras face daunting task of rebuilding after unprecedented…

first_img In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis By Egan MillardPosted Nov 25, 2020 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Relief & Development, Latin America Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Environment & Climate Change, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Rector Pittsburgh, PA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Smithfield, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopalians in Honduras face daunting task of rebuilding after unprecedented back-to-back hurricanes This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Tags Rector Collierville, TN An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Hondurans stand on top of a roof in an area flooded by hurricanes in November 2020. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of Honduras[Episcopal News Service] Before November, Honduras was already one of the most troubled areas served by The Episcopal Church, beset by poverty, violence, political corruption and COVID-19.On top of all that, the country this month experienced the unthinkable: not one but two Category 4 hurricanes in less than two weeks.“This is the story of a poor country that suddenly got poorer,” said the Rt. Rev. Lloyd Allen, bishop of the Diocese of Honduras.Allen told Episcopal News Service by email that his diocese and his country are still assessing the damage from hurricanes Eta and Iota, and frequent power outages are making it more difficult to gather information. Hurricane Eta came ashore in Nicaragua on Nov. 3 with winds up to 140 mph, battering coastal areas. However, the worst damage was caused not by the wind or storm surge but by the severe flooding from massive amounts of rain dropped by the storm as it moved slowly inland over Honduras and Guatemala. Over several days, parts of Honduras received more than 20 inches of rain, inundating towns and cities, some of which were inaccessible. Landslides devastated the region, including one that killed about 100 people in Guatemala.Hondurans remove damaged items from a home in an area flooded by hurricanes in November 2020. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of HondurasOn Nov. 15, Hurricane Iota made landfall just 15 miles south of where Eta hit, an unprecedented occurrence in nearly 170 years of weather records, according to The Washington Post. Parts of Honduras were still underwater from Eta as the torrential rains returned, this time from an even more powerful storm.Some places received a year’s worth of rain in just two weeks, the Post reported. Tens of thousands of people were left homeless, and Honduras’ main airport was underwater for the second time in two weeks, causing damage that will keep the passenger terminal closed for more than a month. Roads, utilities and other infrastructure received widespread damage, further complicating any relief efforts.The floods and landslides “wreaked devastation on a vast scale, leaving death, destruction and missing people everywhere, and over 3.5 million temporarily dependent on emergency aid,” Allen said. The two storms have killed about 100 Hondurans and caused an estimated $10 billion in damage there, the Associated Press reported, and many more people are still missing or unaccounted for.Hondurans stand on top of a roof in an area flooded by hurricanes in November 2020. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of HondurasAllen said that all the clergy in his diocese – which includes 156 parishes and a network of schools – are accounted for, and most are helping with relief efforts. One deacon’s home was flooded, and some church members have lost everything, he said. He has not received any reports of damage to churches, some of which are now being used as shelters. However, the diocese’s Holy Cross Camp and Conference Center was heavily damaged.Episcopal Relief & Development is working with the Episcopal Diocese of Honduras, as well as the dioceses in the neighboring Anglican Church in Central America, to offer financial and logistical support to the recovery effort. Along with Episcopal Relief & Development’s local partners, the diocese is purchasing essentials like clothing, bedding, fuel, food and more.“There is much more to be done,” Allen said, “and we cannot do this alone.”Donate to Episcopal Relief & Development’s Hurricane Relief Fund here.Support from the wider church has been valuable in the aftermath of the storms, but also in preparing for such disasters. In 2019, church leaders in Honduras attended a disaster risk reduction workshop facilitated by Episcopal Relief & Development and Church Pension Group. The diocesan disaster committee established after that workshop is overseeing COVID-19 and hurricane response operations, Nagulan Nesiah, Episcopal Relief & Development’s senior program officer for disaster risk and reduction, told ENS.The scale of the tragedy is compounded by the preexisting crises in the region. Strained health care systems in Honduras, Nicaragua and Guatemala were already struggling with COVID-19, which is expected to spread further in the region as people evacuate to shelters where pandemic protocols like social distancing may not be possible. Aid coordinators fear other diseases will spread because of the flooding.A Honduran wades through floodwaters. Photo courtesy of the Diocese of Honduras“The COVID-19 pandemic has restricted movement in the area and added layers of complexity to any response, challenging the relief and recovery efforts of our partners,” Nesiah said.According to the World Bank, about two-thirds of Hondurans live in poverty. It is also one of the most dangerous countries on Earth, with cities plagued by gang violence and police forces rife with corruption. Violence against women and girls is especially egregious. Conditions like these have driven many Hondurans to seek a better life in the United States, applying for asylum at the border. The lingering damage from hurricanes Eta and Iota is expected to drive even more Hondurans north.Allen says that trend will only increase unless major action is taken to ameliorate the climate crisis. Although individual weather events cannot be directly attributed to climate change, stronger hurricanes – supercharged by warmer ocean waters, as Eta and Iota were – are consistent with climate scientists’ projections. Land use and agricultural practices play a major role too, Allen says. For example, deforested slopes are more prone to major landslides when torrential rain follows a drought.“From my perspective, the main cause is climate change and deforestation. Across Honduras, drought and climate change have left agricultural workers reeling,” he told ENS. “Climate change is transforming rural Honduras, and the effects are just beginning. … Without monumental shifts in small farmers’ resiliency to extreme weather, today’s patterns of disaster, ruined crops and hunger are bound to continue.“I don’t want to sugar coat this … we’re in this for the long haul,” he said.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

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Housing Building in Carabanchel / Amann Canovas Maruri

first_img “COPY” Area:  4441 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Apartments Housing Building in Carabanchel / Amann Canovas MaruriSave this projectSaveHousing Building in Carabanchel / Amann Canovas Maruri Photographs:  Miguel de Guzmán, David FrutosText description provided by the architects. Open to the Four WindsSave this picture!© Miguel de GuzmánRecommended ProductsWindowsAccoyaAccoya® Windows and DoorsWindowsJansenWindows – Janisol PrimoFiber Cements / CementsRieder GroupFacade Panels – concrete skinFiber Cements / CementsULMA Architectural SolutionsPaper Facade Panel in Leioa School RestorationThe proposal is not built from the review of the traditional housing block but from the attributes of the slab of minimum width perforated with through holes.Save this picture!© David FrutosThis situation of minimum bandwidth allows an inner space of considerable size, a public space in the heart of the project, a space that is half open and connected to the whole sprawl, boldly assuming an ambiguous condition, exterior and interior at the same time.Save this picture!lower floor planThe flat is a house with a yard. This small house garden is linked to the interior of the block, the street and the living room. The yard is a sunny place in the winter and cool place in the summer. With cross views of the inside and outside of the block, the garden and the street, light and shadow.Save this picture!© Miguel de GuzmánThe clustering of dwellings is obtained from mechanical necessities. The interior is made with integrated furniture; versatile space with openings available in the wall. The exterior body is constructed of metal, therefore acts as a ventilated façade. The building is an ordered set of car bodies whose metallic colours are the choice for users.Save this picture!© Miguel de GuzmánProject gallerySee allShow lessAsian Culture Complex / UnSangDong Architects + Kim Woo IlArticlesA+D Museum’s ARkidECTURE + Design Workshop at The Eames OfficeArticlesProject locationAddress:Av. de la Peseta – Av. Carabanchel Alto, 28054 Madrid, SpainLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Projects Save this picture!© Miguel de Guzmán+ 37 Share Spain “COPY” CopyApartments•Madrid, Spain Photographs 2009 CopyAbout this officeAmann Canovas MaruriOfficeFollow#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingApartmentsDabasMadridHousing3D ModelingSpainPublished on January 13, 2012Cite: “Housing Building in Carabanchel / Amann Canovas Maruri” 13 Jan 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – Metropol ClassicVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ StonePartitionsSkyfoldVertically Folding Operable Walls – Zenith® SeriesPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesProdemaProdEx Wood Facade in the Aspen Art MuseumSealantsSikaRenovation of Zeitz MuseumSinksBradley Corporation USAVerge Coordinated Soap Dispenser and Faucet SetsWoodLunawoodThermo Timber and Industrial ThermowoodAcousticFabriTRAK®FabriFELT™ for Walls and CeilingsGlassDip-TechDigital Ceramic Etch PrintingWindowspanoramah!®ah! Ultra MinimalistEngineered Wood FlooringAustralian Sustainable Hardwoods (ASH)Australian Oak Engineered FlooringLouvers / ShuttersConstruction SpecialtiesSunshades – Airfoil LuxMore products »Read commentsSave想阅读文章的中文版本吗?卡拉班切尔住宅楼 / Amann-Canovas-Maruri是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream Architects: Amann Canovas Maruri Area Area of this architecture project Year:  ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/197996/housing-building-in-carabanchel-amann-canovas-maruri Clipboard Housing Building in Carabanchel / Amann Canovas Maruri ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/197996/housing-building-in-carabanchel-amann-canovas-maruri Clipboard ArchDailylast_img read more

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Ballard Cut / Prentiss Architects

first_img Area:  2160 ft² Area:  2160 ft² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” CopySave this picture!© Alex HaydenRecommended ProductsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesIsland Exterior FabricatorsCurtain Wall Facade SystemsEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesAlucoilStructural Honeycomb Panels – LarcoreEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesRodecaRound Facade at Omnisport Arena ApeldoornEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesFranken-SchotterFacade System –  LINEAText description provided by the architects. The project is sited on a difficult highly regulated site with a steep slope to the west and a large railroad easement and setback to the east. In response to these challenges the concrete foundation and cellar are set the required distance back from the slope and the framed portion of the house is extended over the steep slope buffer to access the water view. This method of extending volumes and elements over others is carried throughout the project ultimately establishing a simple parti of two stacked rectangular volumes that elevate over the site. The second floor volume is rotated from the axis of the linear first floor volume, creating a covered entry, a stair enclosure, access to a roof garden, and focusing the bedroom, bath and office to views of the Sound and the Olympic Mountains. Save this picture!© Alex HaydenMassing and fenestration are informed by the heavy volume of train activity to the east. The linear scheme allows for the east wall to act as a barrier to insulate both the interior of the house and the west yard from the railroad noise. While the west elevation is largely glazed to allow access to the water view and the view of the mountains, the east wall has few openings to maintain the solidity necessary for sound protection. Save this picture!Second Floor PlanAccess to the house is along a board walk that is elevated over a sunken garden. This garden space and the accessible green roof were important to the clients desiring a transition to terra firma after residing on a boat for 14 years. Save this picture!© Alex HaydenA minimal pallet of inexpensive finish materials was used to achieve an economy of scale and reduce transition details. For example; an inexpensive concrete fiber board was used for most exterior surfaces, accented by smaller area of cedar siding. Tight-knot rough cedar is selected rather than expensive clear cedar. This roughness is balanced with the smooth concrete fiber board to achieve both harmony and economy. Extensive glazing was desired on the west elevation. Rather than install an expensive curtain-wall system, less expensive aluminum nail-fin windows were ganged together and trimmed with aluminum break shapes to achieve a similar effect for a reduced cost. Project gallerySee allShow lessA Crash Course on Modern Architecture (Part 2)Articles30 Unit Multifamily Housing Building / NarchSelected Projects Share Houses Architects: Prentiss + Balance + Wickline Architects Area Area of this architecture project Year:  Photographs “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/369149/ballard-cut-prentiss-architects Clipboard Ballard Cut / Prentiss Architects Ballard Cut / Prentiss ArchitectsSave this projectSaveBallard Cut / Prentiss ArchitectsSave this picture!© Alex HaydenHouses•Seattle, United Statescenter_img 2009 Projects photographs:  Alex HaydenPhotographs:  Alex Hayden+ 17 Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/369149/ballard-cut-prentiss-architects Clipboard ArchDaily United States Year:  2009 CopyAbout this officePrentiss + Balance + Wickline ArchitectsOfficeFollowProductsWoodConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesSeattleHousesUnited StatesPublished on May 07, 2013Cite: “Ballard Cut / Prentiss Architects” 07 May 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Read commentsBrowse the CatalogSinkshansgroheBathroom Mixers – MetrisVinyl Walls3MVinyl Finish – DI-NOC™ EffectPartitionsSkyfoldIntegrating Operable Walls in a SpaceBricksEndicottBrick Facade at the Bruce Nesbitt African American Cultural CenterBathroom FurnitureBradley Corporation USAToilet Partition CubiclesSkylightsLAMILUXGlass Skylight F100 CircularLightsLouis PoulsenOutdoor Lighting – Flindt GardenRailing / BalustradesSolarluxBalcony Glazing – SL 60eUrban ShadingPunto DesignPublic Architecture in Residential ComplexDoorsLinvisibileLinvisibile Products in Palazzo VolpiChairshorgenglarusUpholstered Chair – diva 5-154Wall / Ceiling LightsHE WilliamsLED Downlight – 4DR RoundMore products »Read commentsSave世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Attempted murder trial fails to open at Central Criminal Court

first_imgFacebook NewsLocal NewsAttempted murder trial fails to open at Central Criminal CourtBy admin – July 6, 2011 1153 Previous articleProtobaby rock BialystokNext articleO’Donovan concerned about welfare fraud admin Print Twitter Advertisementcenter_img WhatsApp Linkedin THE trial of a Limerickman accused of the attempted murder of 22-year-old Daniel Phillips in St John’s Square on May 24 last year, began at the Central Criminal Court, with the arraignment and swearing in of a jury early last week. However, on Friday last, the jury set to hear the trial of 29-year-old Shane Mason, Sean Heuston Place, who is accused of shooting Daniel Phillips who was a passenger in a parked car at St John’s Square, was “regrettably discharged” by Justice Garrett Sheehan. Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up In the attack last year, Daniel Phillips suffered gunshot wounds to the head.He spent several months in the Mid Western Regional and Cork Regional Hospital’s after the incident, where he battled to recover from the very serious nature of his injuries.A jury was sworn in on June 29, and the trial was due to begin before Mr Justice Paul Carney. Mason pleaded not guilty, when arraigned, to the attempted murder of Daniel Phillips on May 24, 2010, not guilty to assault and not guilty to the unlawful possession of a firearm and ammunition with the intent to endanger life on the same date.However, Mr Justice Garrett Sheehan told the court that a trial judge was not available to preside over the case until late last week, but on Friday the judge returned to say that a trial judge was not available and was now forced to discharge the jury in the matter. Legal arguments and evidence was expected to be given before the jury of five men and seven women who were expected to hear the case for over two weeks. As the jury was discharged, Mason was returned to custody and a new trial date is expected for later this year. Emaillast_img read more

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Rajya Sabha Passes Bills To Supersede Central Councils Of Indian Medicine & Homoeopathy Medicine [Read Bills]

first_imgNews UpdatesRajya Sabha Passes Bills To Supersede Central Councils Of Indian Medicine & Homoeopathy Medicine [Read Bills] Akshita Saxena18 Sep 2020 12:33 AMShare This – xThe Rajya Sabha on Friday passed the Indian Medicine Central Council (Amendment) Bill, 2020 and the Homoeopathy Central Council (Amendment) Bill, 2020, by voice vote. These Bills seek to supersede the Central Councils formed under the Act by a Board of Governors, which will be constituted by the Central Government. Health Minister Dr. Harsh Vardhan said that the Bill was necessary…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Rajya Sabha on Friday passed the Indian Medicine Central Council (Amendment) Bill, 2020 and the Homoeopathy Central Council (Amendment) Bill, 2020, by voice vote. These Bills seek to supersede the Central Councils formed under the Act by a Board of Governors, which will be constituted by the Central Government. Health Minister Dr. Harsh Vardhan said that the Bill was necessary to prevent corruption detected in these Councils. Background The Indian Medicine Central Council Act, 1970 and the Homoeopathy Central Council Act, 1973 established Central Councils to regulate the education and practice in Indian medicine system and homoeopathic medicine respectively. The term of President of the Central Council of Indian Medicine expired in May this year and it was considered inappropriate to hold an election amid the pandemic. Therefore, the in order to complete time-bound granting of permission to colleges for the academic session 2020-21 and as an interim measure, the Government seeks to empower the Board of Governors. So far as the Central Council of Homoeopathy is concerned, it failed in its responsibilities and did not cooperate with the Central Government to safeguard the standards of education and practice of medicine. It was thus superseded by the Board of Governors for one year in 2018. The period of supersession was extended for another in 2019. The present Bills seek to further extend the period of supersession by one year, with effect from April 24. Both these Bills are already in force as Ordinances. It may be noted that the Acts of 1970 and the 1973 are proposed to be replaced by the National Commission for Indian System of Medicine Bill, 2019 and the National Commission for Homoeopathy Bill, 2019, respectively. The 2019 Bills, that have been passed by the Parliament, seek to establish National Commissions for both the system of medicines, that shall frame policies for regulating medical institutions and professionals, However, since these Bills are yet to be signed by the President and because the Government has sought a year’s time to make the Commissions fully functional, the present Bills seek to extend the period Board of Governors. Indian Medicine Central Council (Amendment) Bill, 2020 Supersession of the Central Council The Bill provides that the Central Council will stand superseded from April 24, 2020 by a Board of Governors appointed by the Central Government, which will exercise the powers of the Central Council. Board of Governors The Board of Governors will consist of up to ten members. The members will include persons of eminence in the field of Indian Medicine, and eminent administrators. They may be either nominated members or ex officio members, appointed by the central government. The central government will select one member to be the Chairperson of the Board. Powers of the central government The Board and the Central Council (after its reconstitution) will be bound by directions of the central government on questions related to policy matters (other than technical and administrative matters). Homoeopathy Central Council (Amendment) Bill, 2020 The 1973 Act was amended in 2018 to provide for the supersession of the Central Council of Homoeopathy and it was required to be reconstituted within one year. This period was amended in 2019 to require the reconstitution of the Central Council in two years. In the interim period, the Central Government constituted a Board of Governors, to exercise the powers of the Central Council. This Bill seeks to amend the Act to increase the period for the supersession of the Central Council from two years to three years, i.e. until April 2021. Parliamentary Debate The House discussed both the Bills together. Some members criticize the Government for not re-constituting the Central Council of Homeopathy in 2018, when the first superssion was sought. Members also criticized the Government for replacing an autonomous body with a Board if Governors that shall be appointed and controlled by the Central Government. They also said that the Government should work to implement the Bills for formation of National Commissions, as soon as possible. In the meanwhile, they sought state representation and representation from recongnized Universities, in the Board of Governors. Click Here To Download Bill [Indian System of Medicine] Click Here To Download Bill [Homeopathy Medicine]Next Storylast_img read more

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SAYING THANKS: Johnson Center to host Donor Appreciation Day Sunday

first_imgLatest Stories “Manley and Mary Johnson have been strong supporters of the Johnson Center from the beginning,” she said. “The Johnsons gave a substantial donation to have the arts center named in memory of his parents, Holman and Ethel Johnson, and they, too, continue to support the Johnson Center.”Dawson constructed the art center’s new membership and donor wall cabinets and was challenged to match the original woodwork in the former post office.“Caleb is a very talented and he was able to match the cabinets in a style that is harmonious with the 100-year-old building,” Pritchett said. “The cabinets are a wonderful addition to the Johnson Center.“Steve, Jim and Harold Campbell and their families donated an upright piano to the Johnson Center for use in The Studio. The donation was made in memory of Steve, Jim and Harold’s mother, Frances Estelle Campbell.” By Jaine Treadwell SAYING THANKS: Johnson Center to host Donor Appreciation Day Sunday Print Article Skip Pritchett said the most recent donors to the Johnson Center are the Mack Gibson family, the Manley and Mary Johnson Foundation, Caleb Dawson, the Campbell family, Regions Bank and Tom and Frankie Brantley.“The Mack Gibson family dedicated the Main Gallery of the Johnson Center and Mack and Mary provided funding for the new hardwood floors in the Main Gallery,” Pritchett said. “The Gibsons have provided invaluable service to our arts organizations over the years, and we certainly want to thank them for their continuing support.”MESSENGER PHOTO/COURTNEY PATTERSONThe Johnson Center for the Arts will celebrate the arts center’s Donor Appreciation Day from 2 until 4 p.m. Sunday and the public is invited. Caleb Dawson built a replica of the original door frame featured in the Johnson Center to create a display case to show all the names of the donors.Pritchett said the Manley and Mary Johnson Foundation also provided funding for the hardwood floors at the Johnson Center. You Might Like Freedom fun: Meeksville hosted annual Fourth of July parade MESSENGER PHOTO/ SCOTTIE BROWNMeeksville Volunteer Fire Department hosted its fourth annual Fourth of July parade on Saturday. There were more… read more Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Published 4:00 am Wednesday, July 8, 2015 Sponsored Content MESSENGER PHOTO/COURTNEY PATTERSONThe Johnson Center for the Arts will celebrate the arts center’s Donor Appreciation Day from 2 until 4 p.m. Sunday and the public is invited. Jeff Ryan with Blockwire Manufacturing in Goshen places letter at the main gallery’s entrance in preparation for Sunday.The Johnson Center for the Arts will celebrate the arts center’s Donor Appreciation Day from 2 until 4 p.m. Sunday and the public is invited.Vicki Pritchett, center executive director, said recent donors will be publicly recognized and thanked for their contributions“The Johnson Center for the Arts has been the recipient of so many good things lately, and we have many people to thank,” Pritchett said. “We could think of no better way to thank them than with a community reception.” Email the author Book Nook to reopen Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Md: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) By Blood Sugar Blaster Regions Bank of Troy donated a large framed mural titled, “City of Troy, Alabama, 1898, South Side Square Looking East” to the Johnson Center.“The mural, by noted Troy photographer Holman Johnson, is eight feet wide and five feet high and is a triptych, which is a set of three panels,” Pritchett said. “The mural had previously been on display at Regions’ Downtown Troy location.”The donor celebration will also recognize Tom Brantley and his wife, Frankie, of Dothan for their donations of the Johnson Center’s bronze and marble gallery plaques.“The plaques utilized marble from Troy’s historic U.S. Post Office,” Pritchett said. “We are deeply appreciative of the support of all of those who have made recent donations to the Johnson Center, as well as those who contributed in the past. We hope that everyone will join us in showing our appreciate to the donors from 2 until 4 o’clock Sunday afternoon.”Hosts for the celebration will be the Johnson Center Board of Directors, members, and staff. Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Plans underway for historic Pike County celebrationlast_img read more

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Wolkoff family firm snags $350M loan for 5Pointz

first_img Tags 5Pointzconstruction lendingDavid WolkoffDevelopmentjerry wolkoffJPMorgan Chaselendinglong island cityResidential Real Estate Share via Shortlink The father-son duo Scott and Andy Singer of the Singer and Bassuk Organization arranged the financing, as they had in 2018 as well.ADVERTISEMENTAndy Singer said the project recently secured its temporary certificate of occupancy and in a few weeks residents will be able to move in.The site was once home to a former water-meter factory that Wolkoff Group’s founder, the late Jerry Wolkoff, purchased in the 1970s. Over the years, 5Pointz turned into a mecca for graffiti artists (or vandals, as some might describe them) from around the world and became known as the “Institute of Higher Burnin.”That changed one night in 2013 when Wolkoff had the site painted over, leading to backlash from artists.A judge ordered Wolkoff to pay a group of them $6.75 million in damages in 2018. Wolfkoff’s development firm appealed the decision, but gave up on the case when the U.S. Supreme Court denied a petition to revisit the ruling last October.Jerry Wolkoff died last summer at age 83 after a brief neurological disorder. His son David is now in charge of the company’s 5Pointz development.Long Island City has seen a wave of new apartment buildings offering cushy amenities and waterfront views.In 2018 the real estate marketplace Localize.city reported that 6,400 residential units would be coming to Long Island City in 2020, the most of any neighborhood in the city. But Covid stymied demand, and the number of new leases signed in northwest Queens, which includes Long Island City, declined every month for more than a year until recently, according to data from Douglas Elliman.Some of these complexes have seen occupancy tumble during the pandemic. At Tishman Speyers’ 1,871-unit Jackson Park, occupancy fell from 96 percent in 2019 to 59 percent as of September, according to Trepp, which tracks mortgage back securities.Nearby, RockRose Development’s 715-unit Linc LIC, at 43-10 Crescent Street, saw occupancy decline from 91 percent in 2019 to 67 percent in the third quarter of 2020.Contact Keith Larsen Email Address* Share on FacebookShare on TwitterShare on LinkedinShare via Email Share via Shortlink David Wolkoff of G&M Realty (Getty, 5Pointz LIC)The Wolkoff family’s real estate firm snagged $350 million in financing from JPMorgan Chase for its apartment project at a Long Island City site made famous by graffiti.G&M Realty secured the financing for 5Pointz, its 1.3 million-square-foot, mixed-use development at 22-44 Jackson Avenue, according to property records. The project will have more than 1,100 apartments.The money will refinance a $300 million construction loan obtained from Bank OZK in 2018.Read moreJerry Wolkoff New York developer dies at 83Wolkoff’s firm still on hook for 6.7M in 5pointz whitewashing judge rulesWolkoff lands $300M loan for second phase of 5Pointz Message* Full Name*last_img read more

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Son launches campaign to fulfill his dying father’s wish of attending Super Bowl

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailCourtesy Lisa Skinner(ATLANTA) — One Georgia son is trying to fulfill his father’s dying wish to go to the big game.Steven Skinner, a loving father of four children and husband to his wife of 32 years, is battling for his life after being diagnosed with glioblastoma, an incurable type of brain cancer.The 56-year old Navy veteran, who lives with his wife and son in Atlanta, has only months to live, according to his wife, Lisa.His son, Andrew Skinner, 23, has started a campaign to raise money to help his father check one last wish off his bucket list, attending the upcoming 2019 Super Bowl.His GoFundMe campaign, “The Commander’s Final Send-off,” was also created to raise awareness for the incredible life Steven has lived.Since Andrew launched the campaign on Dec. 2, it has surpassed the halfway point of its $30,000 goal.“My dad’s been wanting to go to the Super Bowl for the longest time. He’ll have times where he’ll ask if I want to go and say, ‘Hey if I’m able to get tickets for this Super Bowl do you want to go with me?’ At least for the last good while, he’s been saying that to me,” Andrew told “Good Morning America.”Andrew has been by his father’s side throughout the battle with cancer, leaving school at Xavier University to help his mother care for Steven. The couple also have a ‘honorary son,’ Daiyaan, who lives with them and helps care for Steven as well.“Since he only has a few more months — I know he has other stuff on his bucket list that he wasn’t able to do — but that’s the one thing I know for a fact that he’s been looking forward to and wanting to do his whole life,” Andrew said.With the upcoming Super Bowl being held in Atlanta, it would be easier for Steven to travel to and from the stadium.“I figured I would at least see if I could do anything to try to help him get to the Super Bowl,” Andrew shared. “I don’t know if it’s actually going to be possible or not, but I feel better at least trying and saying at least I tried than not doing anything.”Steven Skinner has been an avid sports fan his entire life. Originally from Monmouth, Illinois, he was an excellent athlete growing up, Andrew said. All-state basketball, baseball and quarterback of his high school football team are just a few of Steven Skinner’s early achievements.His athletic prowess and strong academics helped him advance to the United States Naval Academy. While he was at the Academy, he met the woman who would later become his wife, Lisa.Skinner was a sophomore, and she was a freshman at nearby Immaculata College. They dated throughout the rest of their college years and got married at the Naval Academy about a year after she graduated.The pair then headed to Long Beach, California, where Skinner was stationed while working in the Navy. He was deployed to the Persian Gulf for 10 months to work as a weapons officer during the second year of their marriage.He served aboard the USS Rueben James FFG-57 in 1985. Four years later he went into the reserves, and through the reserves he reached the rank of commander.Skinner later decided to enter civilian life to be with his family. He worked at several different companies throughout his distinguished business career, eventually becoming senior vice president of products & resources at a consulting firm, Cognizant Technology Solutions.He was even named one of Consulting Magazine’s Top 25 Consultants in 2015.But his career and life changed forever in December 2017, while he was traveling in New York for business.“Steven had been on a business trip for a day and was coming home,” Lisa Skinner said. She said he called her from the Delta Sky Lounge and said he was feeling funny. “About a half hour later or so I got a call from the Port Authority on his phone that said that they were taking him to the hospital. They thought he had a mild stroke.”“Once he was at the hospital, they saw a brain tumor,” she continued. “It was too late for me to fly out, so I flew out the next morning to New York. Within an hour I signed everything and he went into surgery.”When Steven’s 18-year daughter, Sarah, heard her Dad had gotten sick in New York, she wasn’t fully aware of his condition.“I didn’t think anything of it, like I thought it was pretty serious, but I thought he was going to be OK,” she said. “Maybe it was something he could get over.”Then she heard the news from her mother that it was a tumor. “She didn’t say anything about it being cancerous or anything. She said it was just a tumor that could be completely benign or fine.”“I held onto that,” she added.Skinner spent three weeks in New York at Long Island’s North Shore University Hospital, where he underwent multiple life-saving surgeries.“They did 2 brain surgeries, one day after another — not to remove the tumor — but to relieve the brain pressure. Saved his life frankly,” Lisa shared. “The surgeon here at Emory said that it was so unusual and most doctors wouldn’t have been skilled enough to do it.”During one of the surgeries, the medical team removed part of his skull and placed it in his abdominal area, “for safekeeping,” according to Mrs. Skinner. Her husband was able to return to Atlanta, wearing a helmet to protect his skull.Skinner’s company, Cognizant, got him a Learjet because the couple were having problems with their insurance when attempting to secure a flight. Lisa said the CEO just wanted to get her husband home.Later that month, Sarah found out the gravity of the situation.“Me and my mom were driving to pick up some food for Christmas and we were talking about my dad. I finally just asked her ‘Did they figure out if it was cancer or not?’ And she told me that the tumor was cancerous,” Sarah said.“She told me it was glioblastoma and that’s like all she told me. I didn’t want to hear any more about it. That’s all I asked her,” she added.In April, surgeons at Emory repaired Skinner’s skull, removing the skull piece and using a prosthetic piece of bone to make sure there was a 100 percent seal.“I didn’t even know they could do things like that,” Lisa said.Skinner went through chemotherapy and radiation for the glioblastoma, completing 2 rounds of radiation and chemotherapy pills up until recently.“This last hospital stay they found out that the tumor has grown another branch of arms, so they did radiation on that,” Lisa said.Her husband is now in the in-home hospice stage.“We’re hoping to keep him home at least through the holidays, if not longer, but we’ve learned this year to just do short-term goals,” she said. “That’s our goal — trying to get everybody under the same roof for the holidays, and then we’ll reassess in January when the other two go back to school.”“In the back of my head, I knew the odds weren’t good,” Sarah said. “I try not to think about it. It wasn’t until my family came up to visit me in Annapolis for Thanksgiving, when my mom told me that my dad only had a couple months to live.”Andrew’s campaign to bring his father and extra family members to the Super Bowl stems from his desire to share what kind of person his father is with the world.“Everything he’s been through, from the military to working hard his whole life, if I can just spread awareness on how great of a life he’s had — because I feel like not enough people know how great of a person he is and all the great things he’s done in his lifetime.”“I feel like he deserves it more than anyone I know,” he added.“He’s literally done so much for my family. He’s done so much for others. He has one of the biggest hearts I know. That’s why we wanted to do something that he wouldn’t forget and that he would really love,” Sarah added about her father. “He’s always been constantly working and constantly helping us.”Their mother shares the sentiment.“He was somebody who was gone a lot, in a lot of ways, between the military and with his career, but when you came one-on-one with him — you realize that he was a person that when he was there, he really just genuinely wanted to help you.”“I think that’s why there’s so many people that are coming out of the woodwork and sending us stories,” she added.Lisa said classmates of Sarah’s from her high school, friends of Steven’s from the Naval Academy and friends from his childhood are among those that have reached out to offer support.“He’s even had a childhood friend that flew out — that he hadn’t seen in years — just to take us to lunch, he and his wife. Because he had told his kids how much over the years about Steven Skinner, the big guy in high school he played basketball with, and how much he meant to his growing up.”Despite the hardships the Skinner family has experienced since December 2017, Lisa believes some good has come from it.“This year’s been very hard for our family. It’s brought a lot of changes and helped us realize what is so important,” she said.“I wondered for a while, why this year? Why are we having to go through this year when we’re ending the way we are? But I told the kids that Steven is getting his wish — He’s seeing that Andrew is figuring out the type of man that he is and what is important to him — that Andrew is rising above some of the challenges that he had recently to help his dad.”One of the things that Skinner said about Andrew when he realized the magnitude of his illness was that he wanted to live long enough for Andrew to realize the type of man he is, Lisa says.Along with Skinner, Lisa doesn’t take Andrew’s incredible gesture of putting his life on hold for his father for granted.“For Andrew to be home and help take care of Steven — he’s been such a very loving son.”“My brother-in law-says that Andrew is determined to keep his father’s dignity, so he’s been doing things for his father that not only him but most kids don’t even imagine,” she added.Skinner has also had the opportunity to see his son, Joey, 20, managing successfully in college, after struggling with auditory processing disorder, dyslexia and sensory problems throughout his life.“To see Joey — I call ‘adulting,’” she shared. “The child that we struggled with — with learning disabilities and other issues — to see him living on his own apartment off-campus, going to school and taking care of himself, and cooking. He’s doing a fantastic job.”Her husband has also gotten to see more of his daughter Sarah’s basketball than he’s ever been able to in his life.“He doesn’t like it when we say she’s following in his footsteps — he wants her to make her own path — but I know it warms his heart to know that she’s chosen the Naval Academy and she’s excelling,” Lisa said.The family could never have imagined these past months of indescribable pain, but Lisa is finding the silver lining.“It’s been a gift in a lot of ways, this year,” she said. “It’s not been what we hoped for when we started this and were hoping to get Steven well — hoping that he could get off the golf course like he loves and spend some more time traveling.”But the family has grown through the experience. “Just talking and spending time with the kids, that’s been great,” Lisa said.The Navy man has also had to meet the fact that he’s had a tremendous impact on the lives he touched.“I think he’s realizing — well he does know now — how much people just like him,” she said.She’s also learned something important about life through Steven’s battle.“It’s funny how we’re all so focused on accomplishments. He grew up being the jock and the academic … he’s good at business, he was good at sports, but I think what he’s realizing and he worried about was — was he a good person? There’s a difference,” Lisa said.“The amount of money you make, the awards you get, the championships you win, doesn’t necessarily tell you whether or not you’re a good person. And to have this year for other people to take the time to do that and to tell him what’s been most important to them and how he’s impacted their lives, I think that’s been a real gift for everybody,” she added.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Written by December 10, 2018 /Sports News – National Son launches campaign to fulfill his dying father’s wish of attending Super Bowlcenter_img Beau Lundlast_img read more

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O.C. Schools Announce Reopening Plan

first_imgBy MADDY VITALEOcean City Schools Superintendent Dr. Kathleen Taylor laid out a comprehensive reopening plan for September on the district website Thursday, outlining a blend of remote learning and in-person instruction, with a choice for all-virtual instruction as well.Dr. Taylor also made it clear in the letter that the plan is fluid and that schools may need to close again amid the COVID-19 pandemic.Either way, the district will be prepared to offer an education that will continue the high standards delivered to pre-kindergarten through 12th grade students, she noted.“Our formidable challenge has been in striking a balance between implementing the CDC’s Health Guidelines and Considerations for Schools and maximizing in-person instruction,” Taylor explained in the letter.She continued, “The hybrid model emerged as our best option for accomplishing this balance given the density of our populations, our efficient operations (meaning we have very few unused rooms and no idle teachers), and the range of ages and needs we must address as a PreK-12 School District.”Parents and guardians were asked to fill out a survey and submit it to the district no later than Aug. 7, detailing what their preference would be for instruction – a hybrid or all-remote learning model.The Ocean City district closed on March 16, a day ahead of Gov. Phil Murphy’s executive order to shut down schools statewide. The following day, Ocean City schools offered remote learning to students.Ocean City officials decided to offer the district’s first-ever social distancing high school graduation on July 9, once the governor allowed for larger gatherings again.Prior to that, the district held a red carpet affair for graduating seniors, while adhering to CDC guidelines, as well as a drive-through After Prom celebration.All of the activities, school officials noted at the time, were geared toward offering the students some level of normalcy and a way to make memories despite the many cancellations of end-of-year events.Now that the district plans to reopen in the fall, it was decided that the hybrid model was the most viable option.Students would be split into two groups. Each group would be on two days of in-person instruction and three days of remote instruction.“Opening with a hybrid model is how our district can best comply with the health guidelines aimed at slowing and/or preventing the spread of COVID-19,” Dr. Taylor stated in her letter. “We will focus primarily on the three main principles emphasized by the CDC, state and local departments of health, and medical advisors.”The guidelines will be as follows:Implement social distance guidelines of 6 feet or more, wherever practicable.Wear properly fitted face coverings, unless there is an exception.Engage in protocol and practice that promotes proper hand-washing hygiene.And while families have the choice to opt for virtual-only instruction, Dr. Taylor stressed the importance of some in-person instruction.“Families have the option to choose the fulltime virtual option (Ocean City Virtual Academy) for their child, but we strongly recommend that students attend OCSD with the reopening plan we have in place,” she said.Dr. Taylor continued, “We know many academic, as well as social and emotional benefits, come from in-person schooling. However, families may ultimately feel that the full virtual option is the best option to protect the health of their child and/or loved ones. If that is the case, we will ask families to indicate that preference on the next parent survey.”The plans are preliminary, and would need to be reviewed by the New Jersey Department of Education for compliance and then receive approval by the Board of Education on Wednesday, Aug. 5 at 7 p.m. in the Ocean City High School auditorium, before they are considered official.“Even then, we must remain open to changes as the public health situation evolves,” Dr. Taylor said.To view Dr. Taylor’s letter in its entirety and for all of the other information regarding the school reopening plan, visit www.oceancityschools.org. Students will have virtual classes Monday.last_img read more

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Sen. Bray: Schools without in-person classes could have funding cut

first_img Facebook Google+ By Network Indiana – August 8, 2020 0 194 Pinterest (Photo supplied/Inside Indiana Business) The leader of the Indiana Senate is warning schools they could have their funding cut if they don’t offer in-person classes.State law gives virtual schools 15-percent less money per student. Senate President Pro Tem Rod Bray (R-Martinsville) is advising bricks-and-mortar schools that law will apply to them if at least half their classes aren’t in person.35 school districts and eight charter or private schools, including the Indianapolis Public Schools and Bray’s home district of Martinsville, have announced they’ll start the year virtually, with no definite date for returning in person.House Minority Leader Phil GiaQuinta (D-Fort Wayne) calls the funding threat “reckless and irresponsible.” Gary Senator Eddie Melton (D) accuses Bray of holding schools hostage, and says even schools who want to reopen could find they don’t have the ability to do it if an outbreak strikes their teachers.Republican state school superintendent Jennifer McCormick says she’s “disappointed” at Bray’s letter, and warns it could warp schools’ decisionmaking. Senate Minority Leader Tim Lanane (D-Anderson) says the state should be helping schools reopen safely, not pressuring them.Governor Holcomb vowed in June he wouldn’t cut school spending to deal with a budget shortfall caused by the virus. Melton says Holcomb should issue an executive order making clear schools will receive their full funding — or, if he doesn’t believe he has the authority on his own, call a special session to have legislators do it. He notes Democrats have already called for a special session to address other pandemic-related issues and police reform. WhatsApp Facebook Pinterest CoronavirusIndianaLocalNews Twitter Previous articlePostponement of Mid-American Conference means no Ball State footballNext articleMilford man arrested following confrontation with officers Network Indiana Google+ Twitter Sen. Bray: Schools without in-person classes could have funding cut WhatsApplast_img read more

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