Ten years of being Khoj

first_imgKhoj, a Delhi-based multi-disciplinary cultural NGO, is celebrating 10 years in Khirkee Extension, and doing it in style. No, there is no fancy cocktail opening here; it’s the residents of Khirkee who will get a chance to double up as artists, musicians, actors and cooks in the three-day festival titled Khoj Dus Tak that will kickstart on 23 November. With as many as 21 projects and six events created as a collaborative effort between Khirkee residents and over 25 artists, the event will also witness the launch of the new Khoj building. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Says Pooja Sood, Director, Khoj: ‘Khoj engagement with Khirkee in the last decade — the location, its (often changing) inhabitants and its surrounding areas — have given various artists the opportunity to facilitate creative workshops, events, research projects and other participatory activities with different sections of the community. Such community programmes have always been led by the Khirkee Extension community to produce collective visions and ideas about creative and urban development. It is to celebrate this continuous process of community engagement that we have organised Khoj Dus Tak.’ Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixThe exhibition will be displayed in the newly renovated building and will present a history of Khirkee, with old maps and audio narratives from older generations currently residing in Khirkee. It will also revisit some of Khoj’s old and new community projects. For instance, Window into Khirkee, will conjure a history of Khirkee through old maps, audio recordings of conversations with one of the oldest residents of Khirkee, who is fondly called Masterji. Posters and 3D models from architect and urban planner Sudeshna Chatterjee’s project of May 2011 titled Play @ Khirkee will also be a part. The project explored the landscapes of play in Khirkee and its surrounding areas. Taking a socio-spatial perspective and using ethnographic field work, it explored how play is perceived by the community, how spaces for play are conceived and how children play in urban spaces.Apart from the above exhibition, the festival will also witness some unique new projects. A Photo Studio will be created in one of the rooms for three days and the residents will be invited to get their photographs taken. Khirkee will also change its façade with the Shop Makeovers project where eight artists — Upasana Mehdiratta, Gaurvi Sharma, Vinima Gulati, Ram Bali Chauhan, Tulsi Ram, Amitabh Kumar, Sanjib Roy — will work in collaboration with five shopkeepers to exchange ideas and develop a collective method of art-making.Then there is Khirkee Raag, where Tarik, a band based in Delhi and Shillong collaborates with three musicians from Khirkee to create an original song about Khirkee. Khirkee Se which brings together three sound projects that will be played in public spaces like barber shops and tea stalls, Khirkee ka Khana & Recipe books project, on each day of the festival, where Khoj will invite five women of Khirkee to cook special food items of their own creation.last_img read more

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White Look effortlessly beautiful

first_imgFashion is an individual’s perception of style, comfort, and colours. And, as idea of fashion changes, a difference is observed in the style, designs, and colours that a person prefers to wear. Earlier it was all black, but since last year – white is dominating the wardrobe of fashionistas. White—technically the absence of color – is nearly as low-maintenance as black, with the advantage of being particularly striking in the summerSo, is white the new black? Also Read – Add new books to your shelfLet us know what experts from the fashion industry have to say: Following the idea of minimalism, Sandhya Raman, Co-founder of Desmania says that her label ‘No fuss’ is all about simple classic lines on white colour, celebrating the textures and weaves in cotton, hemp linen, silk, jute, and wool. “I feel white brings out the best in the silhouette, and one can play with the versatility of the colour to create different fashion. Whether for a formal occasion, a board meeting, a lunch date, the colour would never fail to portray one’s character.” Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsive”But keeping in mind the simplicity of the colour, one can definitely accessorise it to suit the occasion,” she further added. Moreover, Sandhya believes that white is one of those colours which appears peaceful to eyes and cooler to mind. Various costume designers around the globe also consider ‘white’ as the perfect colour for stage arts. According to them, white is very responsive in nature and with it, one has the liberty to create different looks. Most of the designers are attracted by the romance, mystery, sophistication, and elegance of the colour. Expressing his love for the ‘colour’, Rahul Krishan Ahuja Founder, Design Catalyst – Three Piece Company states: “White is a blank canvas and can make anything seem clean and clear. Also, the colour can be used as perfect backdrop for a designer to create the best out of their outfit.” Look for this season While white goes with anything, nothing looks better than when it’s paired with purple. It just oozes femininity and sensuality. You can accessorise it with some gold and silver accessories and convert a daytime high tea look to a night out.last_img read more

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Caterina Fakes Findery Aims to Be an Adventure Machine

first_imgApril 3, 2013 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. 5 min read Many of the hottest tech companies today are closed circuits, existing in and for the digital world. But a growing number of companies are founding themselves on the idea that technology can enhance, rather than replace, our real-world experiences.Serial entrepreneur Caterina Fake, most prominently known as co-founder of Flickr, is tapping into this trend with her latest startup, Findery. An augmented-reality app, Findery promises to offer a wealth of information about its users’ environments through annotations of the physical world. The goal, she says, is to “give the world back to people, have them look up from their devices and see the world around them.”Too much technology these days is about “manipulating human nature rather than helping human flourishing,” says Fake, who holds a bachelor’s degree in English literature from Vassar College and laces her conversation with quotes from Wallace Stevens and John Ruskin. She envisions Findery as “kind of a liberal arts paradise,” offering its users everything from personal stories about city attractions to an insider’s perspective of the Dubai World Cup horse race.San Francisco-based Findery launched in public beta last October. The 12-employee company has raised $9.5 million so far from a mix of angel investors and venture-capital firms, according to Fake, the founder and chief executive. It expects to release its free mobile app as early as this summer. In the meantime, you can test-drive the app on the company website. You enter a location into a search bar, and on the resulting map — you can switch between three views, including a detailed Google satellite image — you’ll find notes about people, events and other points of local interest.For instance, you can read a man’s reminiscence of his time in Sossusvlei National Park in Namibia, or learn about a Brazilian journalist’s boat that sank off the coast of Antarctica. “It reveals that part of the world to you as you explore it,” says Fake, who has worked for years on ways of using data to create a personalized experience.Related: NYC Venture Fellows Program Mentors Startups on the Fast TrackFor a tech entrepreneur, Fake is remarkably free of the techno-utopianism that appears to be rife in Silicon Valley these days. “One of the things that I uniquely have as an entrepreneur is that I was deeply steeped in the humanities,” she says, noting that she continues to read and write poetry regularly.With Findery, she hopes to make the things that you’re passionate about “bubble up” — so if you’re interested in architecture you will see detailed notes about buildings, while someone more interested in military history will see more facts about that.The Findery team “seeded” its app with several hundred notes to get things started. There are tens of thousands now, with the majority of information coming from users. Once the mobile app is available, Fake says, she imagines people using it both while lounging at home — “the armchair traveler experience” — and while exploring the world outside.One way to use Findery is to learn about your own city. When you load the app, you’ll see annotations about your immediate surroundings. For example, Fake has learned new things through the app about her San Francisco neighborhood, where she has lived for seven years, such as the fact that Courtney Love lived with Kurt Cobain on her block, and that the local Safeway was almost a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed building.”Recommendation is pretty much a solved problem in the world these days, but the sense of wonder and discovery never gets tired,” says Fake. She wants Findery to be “an adventure machine.”Business owners can also sign up for accounts. Real-estate firm Corcoran provides information about its properties and other local knowledge on Findery in an effort to attract potential clients. The company is focused on product development for the time being, but Fake says the team is already planning one means of making money: sponsored notes. When they are implemented, anyone will be able to pay to promote something, whether it’s a big company advertising its hotel or a local gallery owner drawing attention to an upcoming art show.Fake, who sees Findery as “a living atlas,” hopes eventually to partner with museums and other nonprofit organizations that can contribute content to the app. One existing partnership, with U.K.-based Open Plaques, has provided markers for historically significant events around the world.”My lifelong aspiration has been to make technology more human,” she says, adding that this attitude is what attracts potential partners and investors to Findery. “These are real people, these are real places, these are real stories. It’s got a lot of soul.”Related: The Man Who’s Turning Cities Into Trivia Games Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 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