Orange County Clerk opens Self Help Center in Apopka

first_img The Anatomy of Fear LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply The Orange County Clerk of Courts opened its Self Help Center in Apopka on Tuesday, with an official ribbon cutting.The Clerk’s Self Help Center is designed to provide legal assistance to Orange County citizens who do not have a private attorney, make it closer to Apopka residents, and easier to navigate the process.The Self Help Center will provide the following:Family Law (excluding injunctions)Child Custody/SupportDivorcePaternitySmall ClaimsResidential Evictionsand more“The Self Help Center has been one of my biggest priorities because I know that many people in our community need affordable legal assistance which gives them better access to justice,” said Orange County Clerk of the Court Tiffany Moore Russell. “The downtown courthouse can be intimidating, and some people just say ‘I’m not going to deal with it’. And 80% of our society is never going to be able to afford an attorney. So the hope for this center is to help those individuals navigate our justice system with ease and affordability.”At the Apopka location, Self Help services are available Monday through Friday from 7:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. The Self Help Center assists with Family Law, Small Claims, and Residential Evictions. Services include attorney consultations, form completion assistance, and notary and copy services.Attorney consultations are available and may be scheduled in 15-minute sessions, for up to 1 hour per day, per person. The cost for an attorney consultation is $1 per minute. To schedule an appointment, go to our website at www.myorangeclerk.com where appointments can be made directly online.Apopka Mayor Joe Kilsheimer was pleased that Orange County recognized the need for these services in Apopka.“Apopka is the second largest city in Orange County. More than 50,000 residents live here. And Apopka is also the second fastest growing city in Orange/Osceola (Counties) and when the Wekiva Parkway opens we will surely become the fastest. So the need for this type of Center is clear.” Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Please enter your name here TAGSOrange County Clerk of Courts Previous article407 extension? That’s not necessarily your neighbor callingNext articleApopka police arrest six in prostitution sting Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your comment!last_img read more

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BYU shoots down Virginia Tech 90-77 at Maui Invitational

first_img Associated Press Tags: BYU Cougars Basketball/Maui Jim Maui Invitational FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailLAHAINA, Hawaii (AP) — TJ Haws scored 13 of his 20 points during a key second-half run and Brigham Young made 17 3-pointers to beat Virginia Tech 90-77 Maui Invitational third-place game Wednesday night.The Cougars (5-3) turned a tight game into a rout with an array of 3-pointers, making 8 of 14 in the second half. Haws went 4 for 7 behind the arc and BYU shot 54% to leave Maui with two big victories.The Cougars went 17 for 34 from 3-point range and had six players score in double figures.The Hokies (6-2) matched the Cougars shot for shot in a tight first half but couldn’t keep up in the second. Landers Nolley II had 22 points and P.J. Horne 13 for Virginia Tech, which lost despite shooting 53%.The Hokies were picked to finished 14th in the ACC their first season under coach Mike Young but showed they might be a little better than that in Maui.Virginia Tech pulled off the upset of the bracket by knocking off No. 3 Michigan State before losing to eventual runner-up Dayton.BYU had a similar start in Maui in its first season under Mark Pope, knocking off UCLA before falling to No. 4 Kansas, which went on to win its third Maui title earlier Wednesday.The Hokies and Cougars traded baskets in a back-and-forth Maui finale.Virginia Tech did it from all over, hitting 15 of 27 shots. BYU did its damage from the 3-point arc, making nine from long range.Nolley had 15 points to give the Hokies a 37-35 halftime lead.BYU kept hitting shots in the second half and went on a 17-2 run to go up 58-48. Haws had 13 points during run on three 3-pointers and two layups, including one on an inbound play under the basket after throwing the ball off the back of a Virginia Tech defender.BYU kept making 3s to keep the Hokies from making a run.BIG PICTUREBy winning two games in Maui against large-conference schools, BYU showed the West Coast Conference may be more than a two-team race between Gonzaga and Saint Mary’s.Virginia Tech played well in Maui but ran into two hot-shooting teams. The Hokies may very well be better than expected.UP NEXTBYU hosts Montana Tech on Saturday.Virginia Tech hosts top-ranked Duke on Dec. 6. November 28, 2019 /Sports News – Local BYU shoots down Virginia Tech 90-77 at Maui Invitational Written bylast_img read more

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Panama Intercepts Vessel Packed with Cocaine in Joint Operation with United States

first_img“CBP Air and Marine Operations agents are truly the best of the best and work in concert with international and interagency partners to disrupt the flow of illicit trafficking destined for the United States,” said Director of National Air Security Operations Center, Jacksonville Robert Blanchard. “CBP Air and Marine Operations will continue defending our nation’s borders against all manner of threats.” The P-3 aircrew supporting the operation is based at CBP Air and Marine Operation’s National Air Security Operations Center in Jacksonville, Florida which recently completed its most successful counter narcotics operational year since its inception in 1999. In Fiscal Year 2015, Air and Marine Operation’s aircrews contributed to 198 seizure, disruption, or interdiction events in the transit zone resulting in the interdiction of 206,844 pounds of cocaine. On March 8th, CBP Air and Marine Operations agents aboard a CBP P-3 detected a suspicious vessel in international waters and relayed actionable information to Joint Interagency Task Force South (JIATF-South) partners operating in the area. Panamanian authorities intercepted the vessel, recovered the drugs and arrested two suspected drug smugglers. Operation Martillo is an international operation focused on sharing information and bringing together air, land, and maritime assets from the U.S. Department of Defense, the Department of Homeland Security, and Western hemisphere and European partner nation agencies. U.S. military participation is led by Joint Interagency Task Force South, a component of U.S. Southern Command. Operation Martillo is one component in the United States government’s whole-of-government approach to countering the use of the Central American littorals as transshipment routes for illicit trafficking. By Dialogo March 16, 2016 U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) Air and Marine Operations (AMO) aircrews detected a vessel carrying more than 1,200 pounds of cocaine in the Caribbean Sea as part of a targeted anti-drug effort in the region. The drugs have an estimated wholesale value of more than $16 million. CBP Air and Marine Operations P-3 aircrews from Jacksonville, Florida, and Corpus Christi, Texas are the leading provider of airborne maritime radar surveillance to Joint Interagency Task Force South operations throughout the Americas and have been an integral part of joint successful counter-narcotic missions targeting illicit smuggling operations, weapons and human smuggling in the hemisphere. I think it’s sad that, instead of collaborating with this control, we in Venezuela are in reality seen as collaborators of drug trafficking because we are controlled and governed by an administration of all corrupt politicians and drug traffickers These news make me glad…Anti-Narcotics…Especially given the Mutual Collaboration of Neighboring Countries…which shows Us that A good Union of Officials,…Loyal,…Prepared,… and having good Logistics….can Throw these Bastardly Drug-Trafficking Societies in the Trash…. applause excellent work, they should come here to Venezuela UNFETTERED WAR AGAINST THIS ABOMINABLE CRIME OF DRUGS, I WOULD APPLY CAPITAL PUNISHMENT The cooperation between governments to counteract drug trafficking is good. Good morning, God bless you. Excellent work given the outcome and the transparency of the operations. Recommendable, increase the search radius over costal areas of Venezuela-Guyana-Brazil. Much success. Congratulations to this intelligence network, to put an end to drug trafficking. I congratulate all the anti-drug agencies in the world for fighting against this world wide nightmare which destroys our society I would like to learn more about the subject and how to combat drug trafficking Aya, I hope these small planes are not used for the opposite, because there is already a powerful, clandestine mafia army that intends to control all of South America, where coca, opium, marijuana, san pedro, ayahuasca and other numbing lianas grow. This fight grows more and more and billions of dollars are invested to exterminate it, but it will never be completely eradicated, that is almost impossible, given that both good and evil will be energetic memories in perpetual opposition. Faced with this powerful truth, the best way to control both omnipresent and opposing memories would be to legalize the manufacture and sale of weapons and alkaloids all over the world, fully knowing and broadcasting the causes and the effects of this major social issue, which, by leaving them to their own devices, democracy and world peace will certainly increase, in contrast, violence and irrational, premature death will be reduced to nothing without any doubt. A big hug to all, OK. Hmmm let’s see about Nicaragua when they donate one or better yet let El Chapo go free and send him to that country Just like all other reports on drug seizures, short, no depth.According to an online report, a judge released the 5 accused who were caught in the act, in the Dominican Republic.I don’t believe there are articles in the laws that, for as many benefits as they give, would allow that. Article that does not reveal the nationality of the ship carrying the drugs, it just reports that Panama collaborated with the U.S…………………………………. In light of the decision made by a Dominican judge who released some Venezuelan traffickers caught in the act, all these anti-narcotic efforts are in vain. Such is the reason the dead, lying, cheating Hugo Chávez Frías, cut ties with the DEA, because they could avoid the huge trafficking of drugs thanks to advanced technology for the fight against drug trafficking. It is shameful that today, we are the bridge country for drug traffickers. So why don’t they work with the Venezuelan authorities on this matter? Is it because they don’t trust that the product might come from the “Los Soles Cartel” and the operation could fail? Bravo Hi it’s great they’re fighting this activity, but when are we going to hear about big American drug sellers falling, just the foreigners is not valid either I request through this means of communication to receive reports concerning this renowned digital magazine.I would like to subscribe,Best regards,Cicero Romão de Araujo Really good, but here in Venezuela we aspire to have all these criminals also fall and pay and to be able to bring the stolen money back to our country there we have Diosdado heading the list Cilia Flores Elisami and an untold number of those criminals help us for the love of God I support this initiative. Congratulations to the members of the counter drug trafficking task force I am very interested Good Yadira Mendez Registry:BA-16-10070The Costa Rican National Coastguard Service and Southcomm of the United States, strengthen the connection in the fight against drug trafficking, building bases and the financing by the United States of new police posts.Costa Rica donated the necessary land for the facilities which will be built by U.S. engineers in collaboration with a private company. It is expected to be done by 2017. Being informed is important in these new times and with your newsite it’s marvelous Glory to God Praying, praying, the chains are brokenPraying, Praying, life is renewed To show a button it is not in any way of interest to legalize or stop fighting in any country against every kind of evil since for instance some of their population is not heard from except as a cry and life has been affected in many ways and this country has been challenged because of its sin and the corruption of its leaders and statesmen and Ay when the population’s cry reaches heaven Very good USA Enough. They need to put an end to drugs. Excellent The optimism is very good and the information on everything going on around us great guc I like you a lot very interesting thank you for informing melast_img read more

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Armed Forces Training in Human Rights

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo November 17, 2016 Infantry Major Douglas dos Santos Leite, an instructor at the Brazilian Army’s Officer Advanced Training School, is ready for his first lesson. Today, however, he is not an instructor but a student. It is 5:00 pm on Monday, October 24th, and Major Dos Santos takes his seat next to his traveling companion, Lieutenant Colonel Francisco José Borges da Silva, from the Office of the Commander of the Brazilian Army. They traveled to Lima, Peru together to join a group of 50 officers from the Peruvian Armed Forces and National Police who are registered in the basic international humanitarian law and human rights course offered at the Peruvian Armed Forces International Humanitarian Law and Human Rights Center (CDIH-DDHH, per its Spanish acronym). “I am here because I am going to instruct younger captains on human rights. The Brazilian Army has implemented several measures to make sure the topic becomes more widespread within our forces,” said Maj. Dos Santos. “Today the topic is training plans for soldiers and all military members.” Meanwhile, Lt. Col. Da Silva explains the topic’s importance for his country. “It is in the Army’s best interest to have more people who are trained in, who can deal with, and who can handle and understand the subject,” he said. “The subject of human rights cuts across all of the Brazilian Army’s military affairs.” So much so that Brazilian military personnel attend the Peruvian center annually to receive training and to update their knowledge on the subject. Human rights integrated throughout the Armed Forces “Integrating human rights within the Armed Forces is very important,” said Peruvian Air Force Captain Katty Bejarano Aguado, who is enrolled in the human rights course. “It is an integration that motivates us and allows us to share and debate.” According to Capt. Bejarano, the fact that her classmates are officers with different ranks and belong not only to the Army, but also the Navy, the Police, and the Ministry of Defense is a plus. The course also allows her to better her academic profile and complement her military education as an attorney. The CDIH-DDHH was created in February 2003 to train Peru’s Armed Forces personnel as well as those from other Latin American countries. The center also trains National Police personnel and civilian professionals from the judiciary and the Public Prosecutor’s Office who work in areas related to human rights. The center offers a month-long basic course and a three-week advanced course that allow students to tackle human rights, its principles and protection, as well as to analyze international humanitarian law, international agreements, and the participation of the armed forces in defending and promoting human rights. Students discuss the role of the armed forces within a constitutional framework, their internal and international humanitarian law regulations, take field trips, and engage in other academic activities. “We all need to know about human rights so that afterwards we can be ‘multipliers’ [pass on knowledge to others],” said Peruvian Army Lieutenant Colonel Francisco Pitty Esteban Reyes. The student at the basic-course believes it is essential for military training to include human rights to prevent violations that could result in criminal complaints. More than a decade of service The CDIH-DDHH welcomes students at the door with the phrase “Armed Forces, respecting human rights.” The halls are papered with photographs showing the history of the development of human rights. Classrooms have signs that motivate students to follow the rules of behavior as observers of human rights. After13 years of uninterrupted service, the CDIH-DDHH has trained more than 15,000 military members, police officers, judges, prosecutors, and ministry of defense personnel. It has also awarded degrees to military members from Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Bolivia, Argentina, and Brazil and defense-sector members of the Union of South American Nations. While some officers were beginning the basic course, others were completing their training. “In recent decades, the Peruvian Armed Forces have gone through a process of becoming aware of, and thinking about, its stewardship role as guarantors of state security and human rights,” said Miguel Ángel Gutierrez, an attorney and deputy prosecutor of Peru’s Public Prosecutor’s Office. “The presentations have been interesting, especially the knowledge and scope of international humanitarian law within the framework of international law. Obviously, we were strengthened [by the course] and we would like these types of courses to continue.” For Attorney Sara Luz Canales Aguilar, general manager of the Peruvian University of Global Integration, the course is fundamental because it teaches students that in addition to protecting national sovereignty, the Armed Forces also watch out for the citizenry. In her opinion, this type of training should also be given in universities. Multipliers of human rights “I am going to be an instructor, and I would like to share everything I’ve learned about human rights and international humanitarian law with the personnel that I am responsible for,” said Peruvian Navy Lieutenant Commander Agustín Castro Lecaros, in reference to the need to learn about human rights because of their constant interaction with the civilian population. When they conclude the course on November 24th, the officers will have a new mission – to be “multipliers” of human rights. For Maj. Dos Santos and Lt. Col. Da Silva, this mission can’t wait. “The soldiers see the huge importance of human rights in the missions they carry out, and that is why they know that it is important to completely understand everything that has to do with human rights,” said Maj. Dos Santos. “In Brazil there is a lot of concern over expanding the subject of human rights within the Armed Forces, and nothing is better than bringing people from Brazil to take classes that are offered by this partner nation and by this center of excellence in human rights… This school in Peru is a worldwide benchmark in human rights.”last_img read more

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Lawyers must retain their link to the people

first_imgLawyers must retain their link to the people August 15, 2005 Senior Editor Regular News Lawyers must retain their link to the people Failing to do so will jeopardize attorneys’ historic independence Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Alexis de Toqueville in the 1830s wrote that American lawyers were the link between the people and aristocrats, but today the lawyers who function as that connection are under increasing political attack.Former ABA and Florida State University President Sandy D’Alemberte brought that message to the annual Trial Lawyers Section/Chester Bedell Memorial Luncheon at the Bar’s Annual Meeting.He also conveyed a sentiment that he said might surprise some of the audience, since the annual topic of the gathering is the Independence of the American Lawyer. And his notion, D’Alemberte said, is that he thinks some lawyers — namely prosecutors — may have too much independence and too little checks and balances.De Toqueville wrote that “lawyers belong to the people by birth. . . and the aristocracy by taste and habit, and he looked upon that as the connecting link between the two halves of society,” D’Alemberte said, adding that is one of his favorite quotes.But less than a century after the French author wrote those words in the 1830s, Louis Brandeis and Woodrow Wilson would observe that lawyers were too often allied with powerful corporate interests rather than attending to the general needs of the population, he said.And today, it may be only a relatively few lawyers, such as general practitioners, some trial lawyers, legal aid attorneys, public interest lawyers, and criminal defense lawyers who provide that vital link, D’Alemberte said, which prevents excesses on both sides of the social divide.And yet, those are often the fields of law most often criticized in political rhetoric, he said.The rhetoric was stepped up, ironically, during the first Bush administration at a time lawyers and judges were traveling to Eastern Europe to help set up democracies and legal systems in countries that had been under Soviet Union domination. Then President George H.W. Bush and then Vice President Dan Quayle began claiming, D’Alemberte said, that “lawyers file frivolous suits and hamper American productivity.“Never deterred by the lack of evidence, they used the core technique of modern propaganda — repetition.”The result is many lawyers are afraid to take on large corporations or special interests, even though history suggests they have little to fear. D’Alemberte noted that Brandeis, Chester Bedell, and Clarence Darrow — all acknowledged progressive lawyers — regularly represented corporations as well as sued them. Corporations regularly seek out the best lawyers, he said, without regard to whether they are perceived as plaintiff or defense lawyers.It’s particularly important for lawyers to continue that independent role, D’Alemberte said, adding that in “the campaign to reduce regulation for corporate interests, the only mechanism for accountability is the independent lawyer, particularly the plaintiff’s lawyer.”Some might be surprised that he didn’t include prosecutors among those who provide de Toqueville’s link, D’Alemberte said. But many prosecutors, he noted, are less concerned with justice than they are with conviction rates and length of sentences imposed, and avoiding a perception they are soft on crime.Noting his ties to the Innocence Project, which seeks DNA evidence testing for inmates who claim they were wrongly convicted, D’Alemberte said prosecutors haven’t been helpful.“I’ve been amazed that prosecutors have not been in the leading forces stepping forward and advocating DNA testing,” he said. “Why not? If you’re a prosecutor, wouldn’t you want to know whether someone who is innocent is in prison? Wouldn’t you want to go after the person who really did the crime?”He cited a book written by a Canadian lawyer, an assistant attorney general, examining wrongful convictions in New Zealand, the United States, Australia, Canada, and Great Britain — adding it’s hard to imagine a similar work being written by a U.S. Department of Justice attorney.“Today we have a Department of Justice. . . that is not only silent in the face of overwhelming evidence of human rights abuses, but very active as apologists for those abuses,” D’Alemberte said. “They are advancing policies that disconnect the United States from the rest of western civilization.”D’Alemberte said he didn’t have complete solutions to the problem of prosecutor abuse, but he did make some suggestions:• Have state attorneys, who as elected constitutional officers are beyond the Bar’s discipline system, be subject to investigation and discipline by the Judicial Qualifications Commission.• Relax the absolute immunity enjoyed by prosecutors for the most egregious misconduct, such as knowingly using false testimony to obtain a conviction.• Require a fiscal note be attached to prison sentences, showing the cost of the public, family members, and others of an incarceration.D’Alemberte noted that U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy in an address a couple years ago cited statistics that the U.S. locks up one out of every 143 of its citizens. That compares with an incarceration rate of about one in a thousand for Great Britain and other countries. Forty percent of those U.S. inmates are African American, and 10 percent of African American men in their mid-20s are in prison or under supervision of the corrections system.In some cities, he said, the rate is nearly half of young African American men. “The way we run our prisons, we are destroying entire communities in the United States,” D’Alemberte said.The legal profession must retain its independence and ability to challenge such problems, he said.“Where lawyers are not allowed to challenge government actions, when prosecutors are given too much power, and where you are not allowed to sue the government and allowed to zealously defend those who are charged, government power becomes too great and tyranny quickly follows,” D’Alemberte said. “I can’t conceive but that the independence of American lawyers is one of the most important principles of our society.”last_img read more

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Artisan Market offers all things fall

first_imgShoppers were required to wear masks and the layout was designed to encourage social distancing. Laura Biasillo, Agricultural Economic Development Specialist for Cornell Cooperative Extension says she hopes local markets like Sunday’s will take on a new role this holiday season. BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — The Broome County Farmers Market held their annual Fall Artisan Market Sunday, with plenty of pumpkins, scarves and fall decorations to go around. center_img Organizers say the event is one of two artisan markets held each year, and they were thankful to be able to have it despite the pandemic.last_img read more

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GKN warns on pension scheme covenant if takeover proceeds

first_imgEngineers working on a generator for Brush, a Melrose-owned companyIn its published material regarding the bid for GKN, Melrose stated it would have net debt equal to roughly two-and-half times earnings. GKN’s equivalent leverage ratio was 0.6 times earnings at the end of June 2017.“This may have implications for the covenant strength of the company, the level of the technical provisions deficit and therefore the level of immediate and/or long-term cash funding requirements,” GKN said.The company also flagged its pension arrangements in Germany and the US. In Germany the firm operates Direktzusage pension plans, with benefits paid directly from the balance sheet rather than from an independent pool of assets. GKN said its liabilities for these schemes amounted to approximately £0.6bn.GKN’s UK pension scheme assets ranked it in the top 500 biggest funds in Europe, according to IPE’s Top 1000 Pension Funds study.GKN’s share price has risen by more than a third since the start of the year. Melrose’s first approach was made public by GKN’s board on 12 January. The technical provisions deficit was £0.4bn (€0.5bn) at the end of 2017, the company said. However, the shortfall ballooned to nearly £2bn when based on the amount of money needed to enable both schemes to be transferred to an insurer through a buyout. UK engineering company GKN has argued its pension schemes could be put at risk if a hostile takeover from Melrose is successful.In a notice to the stock exchange published yesterday, the company said Melrose would have a debt level “materially higher” than that of GKN if the takeover was successful. This could push up the schemes’ combined deficit based on a weaker employer covenant.The trustees issued a public statement on 16 January warning of the potential effect on the two GKN schemes if the ownership changed, and the sponsoring employer has now backed up the concerns.“GKN’s covenant strength is critical to investment strategy and the technical provisions,” the company said in its stock exchange notice. “The covenant was assessed at the ‘high end of good’ during the last triennial valuations. An adverse change in covenant strength would be expected to increase the technical provisions deficit.”last_img read more

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Gravity Tripod Foundation Put through Paces

first_imgHydraulic engineering and offshore renewable energy specialist HR Wallingford is conducting physical model testing for a new offshore wind foundation known as the Gravity Tripod. The company is working with Offshore Design Engineering (ODE), DNV-GL, Cambridge University and the Offshore Renewable Energy (ORE) Catapult to test and certify the new offshore wind foundation concept designed by Offshore Wind Logistics and Construction (OWLC). The project is funded by the UK’s Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS).Matt Bleasdale, Director of OWLC, said: “The Gravity Tripod is a unique structure combining the best aspects of other foundation concepts into one low cost solution. It requires no piling, is low drag, low scour, and installed with minimal seabed intervention. The structure is able to accommodate turbines from 3 to 16 MWs, and, having been designed for low bearing pressures, is capable of accommodating a wider range of seabed types, with less seabed preparation, than other gravity base designs.”The Gravity Tripod foundation project will go through a series of stages, with certification from DNV, in preparation for demonstration of the design with a prototype structure.Design work and optimisation will be undertaken by ODE, with testing of the physical components conducted by ORE Catapult. Cambridge University will conduct geotechnical sediment modelling, looking at the interaction between the structure and sea bed.HR Wallingford will conduct physical model testing to investigate the loads applied to the structure during installation, those caused by exposure to large waves once the foundation is in place, and to determine the amount of erosion (scour) that may develop around the base of the structure if left unprotected.Dr David Todd, Business Development Manager for Research at HR Wallingford, said: “The foundation will be subjected to rigorous physical testing in the Fast Flow Facility, a unique wave-current-sediment flume designed for the offshore wind market, making it the ideal location for installation, survival and scour testing of offshore wind foundations.”last_img read more

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Police Blotter 03-01-2020

first_imgFailed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more info Failed to fetch Error: URL to the PDF file must be on exactly the same domain as the current web page. Click here for more infolast_img read more

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Apply for WIN! Youth Service Projects by June 15

first_imgFacebook20Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Thurston County Water Resources DivisionLocal youth groups can earn $300 for environmental restoration projects      The  is now taking applications from local youth groups and clubs for 2015 projects with the Work Involvement Now program—WIN! But hurry, project applications must be received by 5 p.m. on Monday, June 15.Local non-profit youth groups and clubs that receive approval for their WIN! project and provide a minimum of 40 total hours of labor will earn a $300 stipend. Groups must have a minimum of 10 youth participants who are between 10 and 18 years old, and groups must show sufficient adult leadership to be eligible to apply.The WIN! program engages youth groups to help protect local water resources, including area creeks, streams, parks and Puget Sound. Typical projects will involve trail maintenance and pruning, spreading wood chips, removing invasive weeds, and planting native trees and shrubs. Tools and supplies are provided for projects, which typically are done on weekends.There are a limited number of project slots available for 2015, so youth groups are encouraged to apply as soon as possible. To download a WIN! program application, go to http://www.co.thurston.wa.us/waterresources/win.htm. For more information about the WIN! program, contact Chris Maun, Thurston County Water Resources Education Specialist, at [email protected] or (360) 754-3355 ext.6377.last_img read more

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