The machine learning dilemma: So much data, where do we begin?

first_img 23SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr According to industry headlines, the answers to many challenges facing credit unions today lie deep within their member data.However, with volumes of data spanning a credit union’s systems and applications – and multiplying by the minute – bringing it all together under one technological roof is easier said than done.So how can credit unions better manage their data, implementing the right strategies and infrastructure to transform data into both operational efficiencies and better member experiences?“Machine learning technology is quickly advancing and promises to benefit credit unions and their members in many important ways – from fraud detection and risk management to member services and marketing,” said Phong Q. Rock, Sr. VP, corporate strategy and business development for Feedzai. “However, leveraging all that machine learning has to offer requires credit unions to first ensure the quality of their data.” continue reading »last_img read more

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Philippe Coutinho makes U-turn over Arsenal decision after rejecting first offer

first_imgPhilippe Coutinho makes U-turn over Arsenal decision after rejecting first offer View 5 comments Philippe Coutinho has asked Arsenal to be given more time to decide his future (Getty Images)Philippe Coutinho has asked Arsenal for an extension to make a decision over his future after he initially rejected a move to Mikel Arteta’s side, according to reports in Spain.Barcelona are looking to offload the Brazil international this summer and the midfielder’s agent, Kia Joorabchian, has held talks with several Premier League clubs over a potential deal.According to Sport, Manchester United, Chelsea and Manchester City have all passed up the opportunity to sign Coutinho this summer.But Arsenal remain in the race alongside Tottenham and Leicester City, and the Gunners have already made an offer to Courtinho.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTSport claims that Coutinho initially rejected Arsenal’s proposal as the Gunners wanted the midfielder to take a pay cut.But Coutinho has now reconsidered and has reportedly asked Arsenal to be given more time to make a decision over his next move. Philippe Coutinho won the domestic league and cup double with Bayern Munich this season (Getty)The report claims that Arteta is a huge admirer of Coutinho and is keen for the 28-year-old to join the Gunners.Barcelona, meanwhile, are demanding a €20 million (£18m) loan fee for Coutinho and want clubs to fund the majority of the midfielder’s £200,000-a-week salary.Coutinho has spent the season on loan at Bayern Munich and helped the club win the domestic league and cup double.The midfielder scored nine goals and registered eight assists in 34 appearances for Bayern.More: Arsenal FCArsenal flop Denis Suarez delivers verdict on Thomas Partey and Lucas Torreira movesThomas Partey debut? Ian Wright picks his Arsenal starting XI vs Manchester CityArsene Wenger explains why Mikel Arteta is ‘lucky’ to be managing ArsenalArteta, meanwhile, has stressed the importance of Arsenal signing players with the right mentality this summer.‘For me, it’s the number one question when we bring someone to the club,’ the Arsenal manager told Sky Sports last week.‘What is he like? How is he going to react in difficult moments? Is he a leader? Is he someone who is going to push his team-mates? Is he hungry for himself, or does he have collective ambitions? Is he someone who can be stable and consistent in the long-term?‘For me, those are always the first questions when we try to sign a player.’Follow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Advertisement Advertisement Metro Sport ReporterMonday 27 Jul 2020 11:27 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link11.5kShareslast_img read more

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T10 League gets ICC’s approval, Second edition to be held in Sharjah

first_imgNew Delhi: The International Cricket Council (ICC) has officially sanctioned the second edition of the T10 League to be held from November 23 in Sharjah, the tournament organisers said on Tuesday.The apex body’s validation comes as a shot in the arm for the league that will have two new teams taking them to a strong eight teams and a ten-day competition, according to a release.The T10 League is the evolution of cricket, from 50-over games to 10-over games. The ICC, last season, had given the go ahead to the organisers to run the first 10 overs format league in the world. The Eoin Morgan-led Kerala Kings won the inaugural edition last year.“This sanction from ICC for T10 League gives our partners, stakeholders and more importantly the players a much-needed boost. Having said that, it additionally gives us responsibility to ensure we keep growing year-on-year and make this format globally acceptable,” Shaji Ul Mulk, Chairman, T10 League, said in a statement.The second edition of the tournament will have the player draft in September. Afghanistan spin wizard Rashid Khan (Maratha Arabians), Pakistan’s Shahid Afridi (Pakhtoons) and Shoaib Malik (Punjabi Legends), England’s Eoin Morgan (Kerala Kings), New Zealand’s Brendon McCullum (Rajputs), West Indies’ Sunil Narine (Bengal Tigers) and Darren Sammy (Northern Warriors) and Australia’s Shane Watson (Karachians) have already been roped in as Icon players for their respective franchises. IANSlast_img read more

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Murdoch’s plan for Journal

first_imgLike any close reader of The Wall Street Journal, Rupert Murdoch has his opinions. “I’m sometimes frustrated by the long stories,” he said, adding that he rarely gets around to finishing some articles. The editorial pages? He likes them but would like to see more political coverage in the news pages. “I might put more emphasis on Washington,” he said. He’s not a huge fan of the Saturday Journal launched in 2005, but he would continue it and look at converting its Pursuits section into a glossy weekend magazine to compete with The New York Times’ Sunday magazine. And while he’s no technology geek, he also said he regularly reads the paper’s technology columnist, Walter Mossberg, although he added: “I don’t say I understand it perfectly.” Most readers just write a letter to the editor. Murdoch made a $5 billion offer to buy the Journal’s parent company, Dow Jones & Co. To do that, he must first win over the Bancroft family, which has controlled Dow Jones for the last 92 years and has so far resisted all of his overtures, in part because of concerns about what he might do to the Journal. He insists he won’t meddle in the journalism or slash-and-burn the staff. “We’re not coming in with a bunch of cost-cutters,” he said, but added: “I’m not saying it’s going to be a holiday camp for everybody.” In an interview in his eighth floor office in midtown Manhattan on Thursday, Murdoch, who occasionally glanced at his notes on a single page of yellow tablet, waxed on about his plans to invest in the company’s journalism, including rebranding the forthcoming Fox business channel with the Journal’s name. He also spoke of his family’s commitment to preserving the paper’s heritage and, perhaps more surprisingly, with sympathy for the Bancrofts in light of the position his offer has put them in. The family has said that 52 percent of its votes oppose Murdoch’s offer. They have not answered any of his invitations to meet with him and his sons, James and Lachlan, and a daughter, Elisabeth. “My real intention is to try to get a meeting, not to impress them with my charm – if I have any – but to impress them with the intentions and feelings of my adult children,” Murdoch said, trying to assuage concerns about succession at the News Corp. as he leaned back on his taupe sofa. While he said he still has hopes to address the family as a group, Murdoch said he did not personally plan to start to lobby any individual shareholders on the fence. The Bancroft trusts, representing three dozen or so members of the family, own 24.7 percent of Dow Jones’ stock but control 64.2 percent of the votes through supervoting shares. With many other shareholders in favor of his bid, Murdoch might only have to persuade a handful of family members. “I don’t want to be in a position of putting one Bancroft against another Bancroft. I’m not in the business of stirring up trouble in the family,” he said, though that appears to be exactly what he has done. “Our understanding is that there are several members of the family who have not made a final decision,” he said. “I think the next step for us is to be patient – and to be available at anytime should they respond to my suggestion for a meeting.” And if a large majority of the family ended up clearly rejecting his bid? “It would be ugly – depending on your perspective, it might be admirable too,” Murdoch said of the way the family would likely be perceived. “I think it would cause quite a lot of argument.” Murdoch has long coveted The Wall Street Journal. He said he decided to finally make a formal bid after years of flirting with the company. His offer – worth $60 a share, a whopping 67 percent premium – was meant “to get the attention of the owners,” he said, while acknowledging that even some of his own board members who unanimously supported the proposal shared the view that it was “insanely high.” Murdoch needs to win over not only the Bancroft family but members of The Journal’s newsroom, many of whom hope to fend off his bid. Murdoch said that if it were legally possible, he would rechristen his planned Fox Business Channel with a name with “Journal” in it. While Murdoch went to great pains to explain that he sees himself as a lifelong newspaperman who learned journalism from his father in Australia, he also implied that his reputation as an interloper owner was overstated. He said he is not involved with the news operations of the higher-end newspapers, although he takes a closer role in tabloids like The Sun in London and the New York Post. And he said he would propose to the Bancrofts setting up a separate board for the newspaper that would be mandated with ensuring its editorial independence, as he has had in place since he acquired the Times and Sunday Times in 1981. Although he said that he hoped to make money off his $5 billion investment, Murdoch said, as he did in his letter to the family, that being part of his larger global company would allow the company to invest for the longer term. He talked about revitalizing The Journal’s editions in Europe and Asia, which have been depleted of resources. He also suggested that globalization would make The Journal even more important internationally.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!last_img read more

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