Governor Shumlin supports reappointment of Jim Volz as Public Service Board chair

first_imgGovernor Peter Shumlin today announced his support for the reappointment of Public Service Board Chair Jim Volz for a six-year term. ‘Chair Volz has been a judicious Chair for the past six years,’ Gov. Shumlin said. ‘Vermont would be well served by his reappointment.’By law, the Judicial Nominating Board is required to solicit and screen applications for the position, and the Governor may appoint a Chair from the list of qualified candidates provided by the Board.  Governor Shumlin has asked the Judicial Nominating Board to begin that process.‘I am honored to be given the opportunity to serve Vermont for another term and I thank the Governor for his confidence in me,’ Volz said.Volz was appointed chair of the Public Service Board in 2005.  He has extensive public utility regulatory experience, including 20 years with the Vermont Department of Public Service, where he most recently served as Director for Public Advocacy. Volz serves on the Executive Committee of the Department of Energy’s Eastern Interconnection State Planning Council. Volz also serves on the Electric Committee of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners, chairs the Electricity Committee of the New England Conference of Public Utility Commissioners and sits on the Board of Directors of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. He also serves on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission’s Northeast Joint Board on Security Constrained Economic Dispatch and FERC’s Federal/State Collaborative on Demand Response.last_img read more

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CUInsight Minute with Lauren Culp – June 19, 2020

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Lauren Culp Lauren Culp is the Publisher & CEO at CUInsight.com.She leads the growing team at CUInsight, works with organizations serving credit unions to maximize their brand and exposure, connects … Web: https://www.cuinsight.com Details Welcome to the CUInsight Minute, sixty seconds from our Publisher & CEO Lauren Culp with the top three of our favorite things from the week.Mentioned this week:*It’s PRIDE MONTH! Head to cupride.org to learn more about what the credit union industry is doing to celebrate!Post-pandemic growth opportunities: Don’t miss outby MARK ARNOLD, ON THE MARK STRATEGIESIn many ways, society is now looking at the curtain rising on a post-coronavirus environment. Most states are in some stage of gradual reopening, retail entities (restaurants, shopping, financial institutions, etc.) are following suit and the general economy is showing at least a few positive early signs of recovery. Your credit union has likely been operating under some kind of modified member experience delivery model for the last several months. (read more)6 business development tips for the COVID-19 eraby SAM BROWNELL, CUCOLLABORATEThe current business development market has changed over the last few months. It may feel impossible at times to reach new potential SEGs and their employees. Below are a few tips to overcome the current obstacles from COVID-19. (read more)Three surprising data points from our credit union workplace researchby JAY SPEIDELL, MOMENTUMWhat do employees really want out of their physical working environment? What’s the right answer in the open office vs private office debate? How does your culture resonate with employees in the workplace? (read more)last_img read more

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Tests indicate mild H5N1 virus in ducks in 2 states

first_imgSep 5, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Mallard ducks in Maryland tested positive for low-pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza, and initial tests pointed to the same findings in Pennsylvania mallards, federal officials said late last week.Tests ruled out the lethal form of H5N1 virus that has spread through birds in much of Asia and parts of Europe and Africa in the past 3 years, officials said.In Maryland, researchers from Ohio State University had collected fecal samples from mallards in Queen Anne’s County on the state’s eastern shore in early August, according to a news release from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and US Department of the Interior (DOI). Because the mallards showed no signs of sickness, the samples were not rushed and were received by the USDA’s National Veterinary Services Laboratory (NVSL) in Ames, Iowa, Aug 24. On Aug 31, nine samples tested positive for an H5N1 virus. Subsequent genetic analysis suggested that the virus was similar to low-pathogenic strains that have been found previously in North America.A similar North American strain was confirmed just days earlier in two wild swans in Michigan. Low-pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) viruses are common in wild birds and typically cause minor illness or no signs of disease. The mild form of H5N1 poses no threat to humans, the USDA said.In the Pennsylvania situation, the USDA and DOI announced Sep 2 that initial mallard samples taken by state game personnel were positive for the H5 and N1 avian flu subtypes. Testing ruled out the possibility of the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain in the mallards and indicated that the birds likely have the mild strain, the agencies said.Officials said that two different viruses, one containing H5 (hemagglutinin type 5) and the other containing N1 (neuraminidase type 1), may be present. Tests to clarify whether one or more strains of the virus are present are underway at the NVSL.The ducks were sampled on Aug 28 in Crawford County, in Pennsylvania’s northwestern corner, by state game personnel in collaboration with the USDA’s expanded wild bird testing program. The birds showed no signs of sickness.The NVSL will continue testing mallard samples from the two states to determine the pathogenicity of the viruses. Results are expected in about 2 weeks.Wild birds are known to harbor many influenza viruses, and it’s not unusual to find low-pathogenic strains during routine testing, the federal agencies noted.Mallards are commonly hunted, and though there is no known health risk to hunters or their dogs from contact with LPAI virus strains, the USDA and DOI recommend that hunters use common-sense sanitation and cooking procedures when handling or preparing any kind of wild game.In other news, the lethal H5N1 strain has surfaced again in poultry in Egypt, 3 months after the last human case was reported, according to a report today from Agence France-Presse (AFP). Egypt’s agriculture ministry confirmed that a new case was found on a poultry farm in Egypt’s southern Sohag province, about 305 miles south of Cairo.All poultry on the farm were slaughtered, and people who had been in contact with the infected birds were being tested, the report said.Meanwhile, China is still working on a protocol to share its H5N1 virus samples from poultry with the international scientific community, according to a Reuters report today. Agriculture minister Li Jinxiang told reporters at a news briefing that special procedures are needed when viruses are shipped abroad and that government officials were still working out the details. He said Beijing wanted to conform with World Health Organization (WHO) standards for the transfers.China has not submitted any avian flu samples since late 2004, the Reuters report said.A WHO official said China has not yet kept a promise it made last March to provide up to 20 H5N1 virus samples for analysis in WHO-linked laboratories, according to an AFP report published today.”The logistical arrangements are there to ship those viruses,” Julie Hall, a disease expert in the WHO’s Beijing office, was quoted as saying. “I don’t fully understand why the viruses at this stage haven’t been shared.”Hall said the viruses are needed for the development of vaccines and drugs. “China is very important to the jigsaw puzzle,” she added. “It has a lot of detailed information.”See also:Sept 1 USDA and DOI press release on low-pathogenic H5N1 findings in Maryland mallardsSept 2 USDA and DOI press release on H5 and N1 subtypes in Pennsylvania mallardslast_img read more

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Cornelia Fondren records program’s 1st triple-double since 1984 in 97-48 win over Howard

first_img Related Stories Why Syracuse made 65 substitutions in blowout win against HowardCornelia Fondren thrives in multiple spots for Syracuse using toughness and versatility Cornelia Fondren unfurled the tape from her fingers as she left the court. Her facial expression was blank while she walked slowly. Her body language didn’t show the typical emotion that would go along with accomplishing something for the first time in 31 years.Assistant coach Tammi Reiss slapped her on the butt with her notebook and congratulated Fondren before turning to the person next to her and explaining. It wasn’t until moments later, in the locker room, that Fondren found out how historic her game was.For the first time since 1984, a Syracuse player recorded a triple-double. Fondren finished with 12 points, 10 steals and 10 rebounds — compared to her previous season averages of 5.5 points, 2.6 steals and 5.8 rebounds — off the bench in Syracuse’s (9-3) dominant 97-48 win over Howard (2-12, 1-1 Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference) on Wednesday night in the Carrier Dome.“I was thinking, ‘This is her,’” Orange head coach Quentin Hillsman said. “She’s a very aggressive player and her capacity to change the game really was just, with the way she plays, is just what she’s really good at”Fondren was recruited to play point guard, but due to SU’s lack of frontcourt depth and her versatility, she’s played every position except center this season. A minute and a half into the game, Hillsman subbed out his entire starting lineup and because of who went in, Fondren returned to her natural position, which she hasn’t played much of recently.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThree seconds after being subbed in, Fondren got her first of seven offensive rebounds.“Technically, I’m really supposed to get back (on defense), but I don’t want to get back. I want to rebound,” Fondren said of playing point guard. “… It’s no different from when you’re playing the four, the two or three. Just crash and go get the rebound.”With four minutes until halftime, a Brianna Butler 3 hit off the rim and toward the 5-foot-8 Fondren, who was positioned in between Howard’s 5-foot-4 Allese Morrison and 5-foot-9 Hannah Timmons.She reached over them and came down with it. She took one power dribble and bumped her body into the chest of Timmons, creating space to make a layup while drawing a foul.Fondren missed the free throw, but her four rebounds, six points and seven steals in 12 first-half minutes already put a stamp on the game.“She did everything that we talk about every day, which is rebound the basketball, extend our pressure and turn people over,” Hillsman said. “So I think in both those areas, she was remarkable.”Fondren was often the one pushing the ball in transition at point guard. She also crashed the offensive glass with her deceptive strength whenever one of SU’s 57 misses became a jump ball.After scoring mostly on layups, she’d stay near the hoop, manning the top of the Orange’s press and collect a steal with her quick hands. On Wednesday night, it became routine.“She was stealing the ball like a thief,” guard Brittney Sykes said laughing. “Every time you turned around, she was on the floor, she was hustling.”Fondren hadn’t realized how many stats she compiled in the first three quarters but Hillsman and her teammates informed her.“Everybody was like you have to get another rebound, you have to get another steal. I’m like, ‘OK, OK,’” Fondren said after the game, while sighing heavily to imitate how she reacted to her teammates.Fondren’s final rebound came the same way so many of her others did. Guard Abby Grant’s layup hit off the rim. Fondren ran from behind the arc, into the paint and in between two Howard players. Still, she came down with the ball in the middle of the scrum. Jumping before, and above, her opponents is how she did it.Fondren was one of the first players Reiss noticed this preseason in her first season with the Orange, because of her tenacity on the offensive glass. Fondren’s performance against Howard didn’t surprise anyone and her postgame expressions reflected that.“Corn is more than capable to do this every night if she wanted to,” Sykes said.But for the first time in 31 years, a Syracuse player actually did. Comments Published on December 30, 2015 at 11:20 pm Contact Paul: [email protected] | @pschwedscenter_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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