Pride, Red Force fireworks to set tone for Regional Super 50

first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua, (CMC) – A clash between reigning champions Barbados Pride and perennial rivals Trinidad and Tobago Red Force will raise the curtain on this year’s Regional Super50 late this month.The match, a day/nighter at Kensington Oval on January 30, will be the feature in a Group A doubleheader that will also see Windward Islands Volcanoes and Combined Campuses and Colleges Marooners battle at 3W’s Oval in a 9 am encounter.Ten teams have been divided into two groups for the January 30 to February 24 tournament, Group B of which will be contested in Antigua with the night games set for the Coolidge Cricket Ground.Day matches, meanwhile, will be played at the Vivian Richards Cricket Ground in North Sound.Pride and Red Force, along with Marooners, Volcanoes and English County Hampshire comprise Group A while last season’s losing finalists Jamaica Scorpions together with Leeward Islands Hurricanes, Guyana Jaguars, United States and Kent will do battle in Group B.Hampshire’s Director of Cricket, Giles White, said the tournament presented a chance for the club’s younger players to get valuable experience.“We’re delighted to be involved in the upcoming Super50 competition – it’s a slightly different look to our pre-season but one that we are very happy with and we’re looking forward to be heading back to Barbados once again,” White said.We’re got a strong history with West Indies Cricket and Barbados itself and what excites me about this particular trip is, the experience our young players have gained at similar tournaments previously has allowed them to show what they’re able to do at that level, and I think they’ve got an awful lot out of it previously.”He continued: “I’d see this as an opportunity for a lot of the younger players to put their hand up and say they’re ready to play.“It’ll also be a great period of cricket in February where otherwise we’d be indoors in England so it’s a real positive and certainly a useful development tool for some of our younger players.”Each team will play each other twice in the respective group, with the top two qualifying for the semi-finals, also to be staged under the lights at the CCG.Two matches will be played every other day at match venues in the two host territories.last_img read more

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Panel discusses the future of renewable energy

first_imgThe Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism hosted the “Future of Energy” forum on Tuesday night in the Wallis Annenberg Hall lobby. The panel aimed to discuss the transition of energy in the coming years to meet the needs of a growing global population and to address some of the major environmental challenges of our time.The panel was moderated by Fred Cook, Director of the USC Center for Public Relations and the CEO of Golin, a global public relations firm. Panelists included Dr. Don Paul, executive director of the USC Energy Institute; Niel Golightly, VP of energy transition strategy, U.S., Shell Oil Company; and Brenna Clairr O’Tierney, an External Relations Advisor for Shell and an Annenberg alumna.One of the central topics of the discussion was the time it may take for a transition towards renewable energy sources and away from traditional fossil fuels to occur, in an effort to curb global climate change and reduce pollutants and emissions. In spite of decades of effort by the government and corporations like Shell, the majority of energy in the U.S. is still derived from sources like coal, oil and natural gas, among others.“The challenge in all of these transitions is that, for the better part of 150 years, the U.S. has had consistently low energy prices,” Paul said. “We’ve built our system around this for decades.The fundamental challenge is changing people’s attitudes toward energy, transportation and where they live. That’s why the transition is so long, even if you have a technical fix.”Another key aspect of the conversation was the potential of international agreements to play a role in altering the trend towards increasing fossil fuel consumption, as well as overall energy use.“Could international agreements converge around an environment that drove the system uniformly, which is what you need to do? They could, but historically they haven’t,” Paul said. “The problem with something of this scale, which will take decades [to solve] no matter what you do, is that things intervene. You can have a major war that intervenes, a major depression [etc.].”Golightly brought up some of the difficulties faced by companies like Shell to invest in renewable energy sources, one of which is the conflict between shareholders and stakeholders.“We’re caught in a strange predicament,” Golightly said. “A lot of our stakeholders are saying ‘invest more in wind and solar,’ while many of our investors are saying ‘don’t… invest in [renewables]’… So we look at ways that we can monetize and create value in wind and solar. It may be through joint ventures, or through certain parts of the wind and solar value chain. There are lots of other ways to look at how we can do right by our investors and still be in those businesses.”Students who attended the panel were impressed by Shell’s commitment to renewable resources, which they said changed their views on an industry that can often be perceived as doing more harm than good to the environment.“I think with any oil company there’s this sense of distrust with the public,” said Brittany Stamoulis, a first-year graduate student studying strategic public relations. “But it was really nice to see their corporate and social responsibility, and how they’re actually trying to make the future brighter.”Golightly and O’Tierney also highlighted Shell’s desire to recruit younger working people, who are often drawn towards other industries like technology, which many students appreciated.“I really like how they’re encouraging millennials to join their company,” Stamoulis said. “They’re seeing the impact of millennials and are trying to get them on board and involved in the change they’re doing.”last_img read more

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They just don’t care

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! When the Public Policy Institute of California asked the state’s voters what they thought about plans to water down term limits for state legislators, only 29 percent were in support. But when PPIC asked voters what they thought of taking away legislators’ power to draw their own districts, more than twice as many, 64 percent, were in favor. So which proposal do you think is getting all the energy and effort in Sacramento — redistricting, which voters overwhelmingly support, or the anti-term limits plan that voters vehemently oppose? The answer is sad but predictable: The pols are working on the measure that suits them, even if everyone else hates it. The plan to undermine term limits by letting pols stay longer in a single house of the Legislature — that way they won’t have to earn a new job — has been made a top priority. State leaders even rushed to move the 2008 presidential primary up to February, in large part so they could put their anti-term-limits measure on the same early ballot, thus giving them plenty of time to file for re-election should the measure pass. Not only that, the pols sicced some of their most special of special interests — the California Teachers Association and the California Chamber of Commerce — on the job of collecting the signatures to put the measure on the ballot. These interests will shell out some $2.5 million to curry favor with the politicians — favor that is sure to cost taxpayers plenty. At the same time, there’s little effort under way to put redistricting on the ballot. Worse yet, members of the state’s Democratic congressional delegation have threatened their counterparts in the Legislature that they will campaign against redistricting should it also apply to congressional seats. After all, that could jeopardize their careers, as well as Nancy Pelosi’s speakership. All of which suggests that, like last year, the pols will probably wait until the last possible minute, then let the redistricting idea die on some technicality. It’s easy to see why: Pols like undoing term limits because it expands their power. They hate fair redistricting because it undermines their power. Their self-serving ways have a wickedly corrosive effect on state politics. According to the Secretary of State’s office, since 2005, the number of eligible voters has increased by more than 300,000, but the numbered of registered voters has dropped nearly 1 million. Far fewer bother to vote at all. Bottom line: Californians are tuning out politics because they’re fed up with unresponsive politicians. But that doesn’t bother the Legislature’s leaders. For them, power matters greatly — unlike the public’s opinion, which couldn’t matter less.last_img read more

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