Fiery Peruvian Airlines crash caught on video

first_imgAstonishing video has emerged of passengers escaping a burning Peruvian Airlines Boeing 737 Tuesday after it veered off the runway burst into flames while landing at the provincial city of Jauja in Peru.The airline said 141 passengers were on board the flight from the Peruvian capital but all had been evacuated safely and there were no serious injuries.It  said in a statement the Boeing 737-300 “turned on the right side, skidding off the runway’’ but the high professionalism of its crew prevented major injury.The Aviation Herald said the B737-300  landed on Jauja’s runway 31 at about 16:40 local time.It said it veered off the runway, suffered the collapse of all gear and burst into flames, coming to a stop after skidding on fire for some distance. Passengers reported there were two strong impacts upon arrival and local media reported 29 people were taken to hospital.Peruvian authorities are investigating the incident.last_img read more

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Profitability on straddle trades

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Sometimes ideas for trades come from unlikely circumstances. While I was presenting a grain marketing seminar in February a farmer said he would never consider selling options because of the risk of large price movements. While I understand his fear, I don’t agree. Farmers’ fear of selling options can be due to many factors, including lack of education, complexities of the trades, and misunderstood risk exposure.I asked this farmer where he thought July corn would be on 6/22/18. He first said he had no idea, and I agreed, as I don’t know either. However, I asked him to take a guess. He said since corn was around $3.80 on that day, that it would be a reasonable estimate that corn would be around $3.90 in late June. I agreed, that would be my guess as well, based upon what we knew that day. I actually came up with the following trade on the spot to illustrate my point with the farmer in the presentation. However, after spending more time thinking about it, I thought it had potential in my marketing strategy as well. Following are the details of the trade: On 2/26/18 when July corn was $3.82Sell a $3.90 straddle (where I sell both the put and call for the same strike price)Buy a $3.60 putCollect a total of 28 cents premium for the tradeI then walked the farmer through all the possible outcomes of this trade.If corn is below $3.62 on 6/22/18, I don’t get to sell any corn and I could lose up to 2 cents MAX (Note: the $3.60 put purchase minimizes the downside risk in this trade)If corn is above $4.18 on 6/22/18, I have to sell 10% of my 2017 production for $3.90 plus the 28 cents from the sale of the options, so I would get $4.18 total.If corn is between $3.62 and $4.18, I will make some premium on this trade but no sale has to be made. The closer July corn is to $3.90, the more of the 28 cents premium I get to keep.Worst case scenario — prices fall below $3.62 and I lose 2 cents. I didn’t, and still don’t, think this is likely right now, but I’m comfortable with this scenario if it happens.Better scenario – corn prices are above $4.18. While I will have a price ceiling of $4.18 with this trade with a few of my bushels, I’ll be happy to get that price. Plus, if prices go this high or higher, I have more corn to sell and can still take advantage of that opportunity.Best case scenario — corn prices fall between $3.62-$4.18 and I pick up some premium. Like the farmer I met, I think it is most likely that corn prices will be around $3.90 in late June. If that happens I could pick up nearly 28 cents of premium on some of my bushels.I’m comfortable with all possible scenarios, so I placed the trade. Market action results – April option expiredAs always, I like to report back on how the trades I write about turn out. I like to be fully transparent, including the good and the bad, because there is always something to be learned in providing details of actual trades, rather than theoretical ideas or general market statements.Sold a call — ResultsOn 12/27/17 when May corn was $3.62. I sold an April $3.60 call for 10 cents against 10% production of my ’17 production.What does this mean?If corn is trading below the strike price when this option expires I keep the premium and add it to another trade down the road.If corn is trading above the strike price when this option expires I have to sell corn for the strike price PLUS the premium.I don’t really want to sell corn for $3.60 against May futures, but if it happens, I would actually get $3.70 with the 10-cent premium. Not ideal, but not terrible considering the price level trending at the time. Plus, I’ve made some premium selling other calls that I could apply to this trade to increase this sell price. What happened?Corn was above $3.70 on 3/23/18, so I sold 10% of my production at $3.70. Again, this is not an ideal trade, but I have enough premium captured from other trades up to this point that I’ll be able to pull this sale up to profitable levels. Since I never know for sure where the markets are going this is bound to happen from time to time. This is another reason why capturing added premium in the market whenever I can is so important for my marketing strategy. Straddle trade — resultsOn 12/26/17 when May corn was $3.62, I sold a straddle on 10% of my ’17 production:Sold April $3.55 straddle, where I sold both the $3.55 put and $3.55 call and collect an 18 cent premiumTrade Expires on 3/23/18Potential benefit: If May futures close at $3.55 on 3/23/18, I keep all of the 18-cent premiumPotential concern: Reduced or no premium if the market moves significantly in either directionOn every trade, I know, and am willing to accept every possible outcome. For every penny lower than $3.55 I get less premium until $3.37. At $3.37 or lower I will be losing money on this trade penny for penny. For every penny higher than $3.55 I get less premium until $3.73. At $3.73 or higher I have to make a corn sale at $3.55 against March futures, but I still get to keep the 18 cents so it’s like selling $3.73.I am most profitable on this trade if the market stays sideways at the end of March. If this happens, I would take the additional premium and add it to my “pot of premium” I’ve been collecting by selling options during the long-term sideways market. If the market rallies, I would have to sell some grain at higher levels than where prices were in December.If corn falls below $3.37 on 3/23/18, it isn’t as ideal. I would either buy back the straddle for a loss or remove a previous sale and take profits on the difference.What happened?This is a great example for why I always write down why I make trades. Time passes, and it’s not always easy to remember your mindset when placing trades without notes. In December most corn predictions were doom and gloom. Many thought the sideways market would continue until at least summer or possibly longer. I was trying to add premium, instead of waiting and hoping for rallies that might not come. Ultimately, the market outperformed where I thought it could go, which is a great thing for all of my ’17, ’18 and ’19 corn I still need to price.On 3/20/18, when May corn pulled back to $3.74, I bought back the $3.55 call portion of the straddle for 19 cents. I left the $3.55 sold puts to expire on 3/23/18. With the 18-cent premium from the original sale of straddle, I’m only down 1 cent before commissions. Since I let the sold $3.60 call trade above execute, and I’m bullish corn right now, I didn’t want another sale at the $3.70’s level to happen this month.Basically, this trade was almost a wash in the end (down 1 cent), but it had the potential for added premium if the market stayed sideways, which seemed very likely at the time and why the trade was originally placed. I’m fine with the outcome of this trade. Straddles have been making me quite a bit of premium up to this point. New straddle tradeWith one straddle coming off this week but not resulting in any additional sale I want to replace it with another one. This also allows me to offset the 1 cent loss of the previous straddle trade. Details are as follows:Sold – Sep $3.80 straddle (sold both the $3.80 put and $3.80 call)Bought – Sep $3.60 putCollected – 34 cent of premiumTrade Expiration – 8/24/18Potential Benefit – If Sep futures close at $3.80 on 8/24/18, I keep all of the 34 cent premium, less the 1 cent loss from above straddle trade. After all commissions from that straddle trade above and this new straddle, I can make potentially another 30 cents of premium.Potential Concern – Reduced or no premium if the market moves significantly in either directionOn every trade, I know, and am willing to accept every possible outcome. For every penny lower than $3.80 I get a penny less of my premium until $3.60. At $3.60 or lower I don’t sell anything, but I’m guaranteed at least 10 cents of premium, that I can apply to my pot of premium I have been collecting this year for the ’17 crop. For every penny higher than $3.80 I get a penny less of my premium until $4.10. At $4.10 or higher I have to make a corn sale at $3.80 against Sep futures, but I still get to keep the 30 cents so it’s like selling $4.10. Between $3.60 and $4, I’ll make a premium of 10 to 30 cents, but no additional sale has to be made.With the loss on the April straddle and replacing it with this Sep straddle I’m “kicking the can down the road.” I don’t want to sell corn near $3.70 against May futures. I want more upside potential because I believe the markets are in a different place than they were three months ago.This trade is most advantageous if the market remains steady or higher. Even if the market drops, I’m guaranteed to not lose any money from the options. The only negative with this trade is if the market drops in late August and I don’t take an opportunity beforehand to get more of my ’17 corn priced above a level equal to $3.73 against the May. New 2019 corn saleOn 3/13/18 when corn rallied, an order I had in place was hit and I sold my first 10% of production for 2019 at $4.18 against Dec ’19 futures. Am I missing out on rallies?Several farmers have wondered if all my straddle and sold call positions keep me from taking advantage of market rallies, like the most recent one I witnessed.As I always say, I’m fine missing out on a rally with some of my bushels because I always have more corn to sell. With the most recent unexpected rally, old crop corn futures rallied 30 cents over the last 90 days. With all of the options positions I had in place, I still collected about 15 cents of premium, or about half of the recent rally that most people, including me, didn’t expect would even happen.By including trades and options that are basically a bet against what I really want to happen in the market allows me to have a more balanced and controlled marketing plan. Waiting and hoping for a rally relies too heavily on luck and timing, which are impossible to predict long-term because there are too many variables.I prefer a marketing plan that has potential profit when the market trades sideways at unprofitable prices for any amount of time. I can still be ready to take advantage of rallies with future unpriced corn if opportunities become available. This strategy seems much safer and less risky to me than waiting for uncertain rallies to come. The sideways market of the past year is a great example that rallies are unpredictable and may take a long time to develop. My marketing strategy isn’t to hit the top of every rally, which is impossible to do, but keep my farm operation profitable year after year.*** It should be noted that I choose to reown the straddle trade instead of the call trade. I could have chosen either trade to buy back and replace with the Sep straddle. The end result of my trade values should be equal with either trade because the straddle would have earned me a $3.73 sale instead of the call that only earned me a $3.70 sale. The losses would have been 3 cents more on the buyback of the call but the futures sale with the options premium collected would have offset this loss *** Jon grew up raising corn and soybeans on a farm near Beatrice, NE. Upon graduation from The University of Nebraska in Lincoln, he became a grain merchandiser and has been trading corn, soybeans and other grains for the last 18 years, building relationships with end-users in the process. After successfully marketing his father’s grain and getting his MBA, 10 years ago he started helping farmer clients market their grain based upon his principals of farmer education, reducing risk, understanding storage potential and using basis strategy to maximize individual farm operation profits. A big believer in farmer education of futures trading, Jon writes a weekly commentary to farmers interested in learning more and growing their farm operations.Trading of futures, options, swaps and other derivatives is risky and is not suitable for all persons. All of these investment products are leveraged, and you can lose more than your initial deposit. Each investment product is offered only to and from jurisdictions where solicitation and sale are lawful, and in accordance with applicable laws and regulations in such jurisdiction. The information provided here should not be relied upon as a substitute for independent research before making your investment decisions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC is merely providing this information for your general information and the information does not take into account any particular individual’s investment objectives, financial situation, or needs. All investors should obtain advice based on their unique situation before making any investment decision. The contents of this communication and any attachments are for informational purposes only and under no circumstances should they be construed as an offer to buy or sell, or a solicitation to buy or sell any future, option, swap or other derivative. The sources for the information and any opinions in this communication are believed to be reliable, but Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC does not warrant or guarantee the accuracy of such information or opinions. Superior Feed Ingredients, LLC and its principals and employees may take positions different from any positions described in this communication. Past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. He can be contacted at [email protected]last_img read more

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How New Low Light Cameras Are Simplifying the Long Take

first_imgThe long take is a complicated shot, and lighting one is no simple task. However, today’s low light cameras are solving the problem.Cover image via RED.The long take, or the “oner,” requires the coordination of multiple filmmakers, and one of the biggest challenges is lighting the shoot properly. The movement involved in this kind of shot restricts the lighting setup that most filmmakers would use in a standard scene, adding to the complexity of the sequence. However, the increasing low light capabilities of today’s cameras are making this particular element of shooting the oner easier to deal with.But first, what is the oner? And when do you use it? Let’s look at some examples.Paul Thomas Anderson pulls off a long take in stirring fashion with an amazingly well-choreographed long tracking shot of the death of Little Bill in Boogie Nights. There is nothing gimmicky about this choice — it completely serves the emotional beats of the scene. The camera follows Bill as he enters a lively New Year’s Eve party moments before midnight, searching for his wife only to find her in the arms of another man.Image via New Line Cinema.He starts outside, entering the home and making his way through a sea of partygoers, stopping in three places for dialogue, where the filmmakers could easily conceal a boom mic out of frame. The most brilliant economy of staging is in the kitchen, where Bill delivers his line to an off-screen Kurt. They pass each other, and Kurt stops in the exact same spot to answer.The sequence has only one cut: a reaction shot of the party guests hearing gunfire that ends with what appears to be the end of the long take. My theory is that Anderson cut to the crowd because the last shot of Bill required an explosive squib, and they couldn’t pull it off safely as part of the longer take.Cinematographer Robert Elswit shot Boogie Nights on a Moviecam Compact Camera, a Panavision Panaflex Gold Camera, and Panavision C Series anamorphic lenses. His collaboration with Anderson (they have worked on six films together) has produced a flexibility of style such that no film has the same look. Elswit relies heavily on working with the production designer (whom he credits with getting him the Academy Award win for There Will Be Blood) and adapting to Anderson’s loose blocking, which often allows the actors freedom of movement.More Than One Take on the OnerImage via Paramount.In Boogie Nights, the long take added tension. Another reason you might want to consider the oner is to add excitement to an expository scene. In Raiders of the Lost Ark, a strictly informational scene between Brody and Indy is dynamically blocked in a long take to give it a snappy pace.Cinematographer Douglas Slocombe used Panavision cameras and lenses and famously never used a light meter while achieving his genius use of shadows and warm, golden light.In the Russian art film The Mirror, director Andrei Tarkovsky visually stuns with a beautiful take that is lushly framed and moves on action but adds to the oddity of the unconventionally structured film with a unique sound design. We hear an unseen dog barking and a cuckoo clock blaring. A bottle, unprompted, falls off a table, but there is no sound of rain or fire even though the door is open. We only hear the roar of the flame and the pouring water when Alexei enters the doorway and takes in the tragic scene of the burning barn.The emotive cinematography is the work of director of photography Georgi Rerberg; he used ARRI and Mitchell BNCR cameras. The film alternates between black and white, color, and sepia-tinted film — in this oner, Tarkovsky and Rerberg give us a visceral landscape of natural elements. The lighting matches the heaviness of the moment, like a dark mist.The Level Low Light Playing FieldWhether there’s an art film or a big studio behind the long take, it often requires considerable resources. But with the availability now of low light cameras, directors don’t have to sacrifice artistic vision to get the shot and the look they desire.It’s become considerably easier on the lighting crew to pull off the complexity of these takes by being able to hide lights and use battery-operated LEDs, practicals, and available light because the noise is reduced in the footage captured by cameras like the ARRI Alexa, Canon C200, and the RED EPIC-W.You may want to consider shooting raw (if you can afford the space) to enhance color and quality and improve low light performance. You’ll need to process it using programs such as DaVinci Resolve, but you’ll have the benefit of all the data the sensor captured.Image via Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer.ALEXA’s custom CMOS sensor has the same height and width as a 35mm film frame. The sensor’s 3.4K horizontal photosite count delivers unusually large photosites for an optimal balance between image sharpness on the one hand and high dynamic range, high sensitivity, and a low noise floor on the other.The Canon C200 Super 35mm CMOS Sensor maximizes light gathering and also reduces data-readout time for fewer rolling shutter artifacts.One of the best, however, is the Gemini 5k S35 sensor for the RED EPIC-W camera. It was designed with a low light mode specifically for darker environments, making it an excellent choice to get cleaner imagery with less grain and better shadow detail. Of course it should be out of this world — it was developed for low-light conditions in outer space.One small step for man, one long take for filmmakers hoping to get that perfectly choreographed shot.Looking for more filmmaking tips and tricks? Check out these articles.Should You Turn Down a Distribution Deal and Do It Yourself?Sci-Fi 101: Tips for Creating Awesome Time Travel FilmsHow to Get the Most Out of Your Single Location ShootEverything You Need to Know About Stabilizing a ShotHow to Clean up Noisy Video and Audio in 30 Secondslast_img read more

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Cricketers to get fatter pay cheques

first_imgIndia’s rich cricketers are set to get wealthier with a new BCCI contract coming their way.  Grade A cricketers such as Sachin Tendulkar, Virender Sehwag, VVS Laxman, Harbhajan Singh and Rahul Dravid stand to get a 60 per cent hike in their annual payments. Their new pay packet will be Rs 1 crore.Grade B and Grade C players will get Rs 50 lakh and Rs 25 lakh per year respectively – an increase of 25 per cent. The BCCI has done away with Grade D. The board has made playing Tests more lucrative. In each Test match, a player will earn Rs 7 lakh – more than double the current pay of Rs 3 lakh. The decision looks like a reward for India’s continuing No. 1 Test status. The ODI fee too has been increased, but relatively less. Every ODI will now fetch players Rs 4 lakh as against Rs 2.5 lakh earlier. For T20s, the players will be paid Rs 2 lakh.  The board has also redrawn the groups. Group ASachin TendulkarMS DhoniGautam GambhirVirender SehwagRahul DravidVVS LaxmanSuresh RainaHarbhajan Singh Zaheer Khan Group B Yuvraj SinghIshant SharmaAshish NehraPraveen KumarVirat KohliM VijayPragyan Ojha Group C S SreesanthAmit MishraR AshwinRohit SharmaCheteshwar PujaraRavindra JadejaAbhimanyu MithunVinay Kumarlast_img read more

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Feel assured in team now, says VVS Laxman

first_imgHe has been a long-time middle-order mainstay of India’s batting line-up but veteran VVS Laxman says he started feeling assured in the team only in the last four years during which he was given the “freedom” to play his natural game.Laxman still remembers the years when he wasn’t made to feel an automatic choice in India’s playing XI even after he had crafted the legend of 281 against the Australians at Eden Gardens in the waning winter of 2001.”In the last four years, first Anil (Kumble) bhai and then Mahendra Singh (Dhoni), as well as coach Gary (Kirsten), have given me an assurance in the team, the freedom to play my natural game, and I’ve been able to translate that freedom into performance,” reflects Laxman.”During my first four years, between 1996-2000, while opening the innings and trying to do my best for the team, whenever I failed in two innings, people used to brand me as a non-regular opener and I used to get dropped very frequently,” he recalled.Gearing up for the Test series against England that starts at Lord’s from July 21, Laxman said he desires to strike his first century against the hosts in a wining cause.”I haven’t made a century in England yet; nor the team has won at Lord’s while I have been around,” states Laxman.Laxman views his career in two halves — one before and one after 2007 when he felt completely assured in the team.-With PTI inputslast_img read more

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Mountain Terrain Biking race concludes

first_imgItanagar, Oct 20 (PTI) The first ever Mountain Terrain Biking (MTB) race of the North East India, also referred to as Hornbills Flight concluded here today in a ceremony attended by Chief Minister Pema Khandu.Khandu congratulated all the riders on their successful completion of their race while giving away the award to the winners of the race.The seven-day race sponsored by Dalmia Bharat Cement, Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) and state Tourism department was flagged-off from Mechuka on October 14.It culminated today here after covering a distance of 730 km with participation of 70 riders from India, Germany, Portugal, Nepal and Czech Republic.Ilda Pereira of Portugal won the women?s open race, while in the men?s category, Mukesh Kumar of the Indian Army won the race with each taking away the prize money of Rs 1 lakh.Deputy Chief Minister Chowna Mein gave away the prize of ?Best Indian Rider? to Mukesh Kumar.Khandu in his speech announced to hold the event next year in a more grand manner.He said Mechuka is poised to become number one tourist destination in Arunachal as it offers ample opportunity for adventure sports.He said road communications to Mechuka are being improved and apologised to the riders for any inconvenience for present poor state of the road.Referring to tourism as the engine of growth, the chief minister said the state government is giving high priority to it.He informed that state Tourism department this year has seen huge jump in its financial allocation, which was raised to Rs 100 crore from earlier Rs 16 crore within two financial years. PTI UPL RGadvertisementlast_img read more

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Shiffrin, Pinturault Get Wins for the World Cup Record Book

first_imgSOLDEU, Andorra (AP) — Citius, altius, 40th.Embodying the Olympic motto in a World Cup slalom Saturday, Mikaela Shiffrin went faster in her second slalom run and higher in the World Cup all-time lists by being stronger than Wendy Holdener to win an intense duel.Shiffrin’s 40th career victory in World Cup slaloms tied her with Swedish great Ingemar Stenmark’s record for wins in the discipline.“It was just a really amazing day to be racing,” Shiffrin said in the sun-bathed finish area in Andorra, one hour after Alexis Pinturault also set a record winning the final men’s giant slalom of the season.Pinturault became the most prolific French skier on the 52-year World Cup circuit with his 23rd career victory.Shiffrin had trailing 0.28 seconds behind first-run leader Holdener and won by just 0.07 after both racers visibly pushed their limits slicing through the gates.United States’ Mikaela Shiffrin reacts after winning a women’s World Cup slalom at the alpine ski, World Cup finals in Soldeu, Andorra, Saturday, March 16, 2019. (AP Photo/Gabriele Facciotti)Holdener’s unlucky defeat extended her own unwanted World Cup record with a 22nd career podium finish in slalom without a victory.That’s the most top-three placings in a single discipline without winning for any man or woman in World Cup history.“I can see the frustration in her eyes,” Shiffrin said. “I have a lot of respect for Wendy. She is so strong.”Shiffrin, the 2014 Sochi Olympics gold medalist, earned 100 race points to lift her season-long total in the slalom standings to a remarkable 1,160 — more than every woman skier’s total over all disciplines, except for overall standings runner-up Petra Vlhova.Shiffrin’s mammoth 2,104 points overall — the second-highest total ever — is more than 800 ahead of Vlhova. Holdener is third.Vlhova placed third Saturday but trailed more than a second behind the standout leading pair.Frida Hansdotter, the 2018 Olympic slalom champion competing in her final World Cup race, placed fifth, 1.89 behind Shiffrin.Pinturault retained his first-run lead to finish 0.44 seconds ahead of Swiss prospect Marco Odermatt, who earned a career-best result.France’s Alexis Pinturault celebrates winning an alpine ski, men’s giant slalom, at the alpine ski, World Cup finals in Soldeu, Andorra, Saturday, March 16, 2019. (AP Photo/Gabriele Facciotti)Zan Kranjec was third, trailing 1.03 behind Pinturault, who broke a tie with Carole Merle for the all-time record by a French racer. Merle got her 22 wins in giant slalom and super-G from 1988-93. Alpine great Jean-Claude Killy won 18 times.Marcel Hirscher placed sixth, 1.74 back, having already clinched his fifth straight title in the season-long giant slalom standings.“It’s really cool to have this globe,” Hirscher said, holding the crystal trophy he also won in 2012. “It’s surreal to have it for six years now.”The Austrian star has also secured a record eighth straight overall World Cup title, though had his lead cut to 415 points by Pinturault ahead of the season-ending slalom on Sunday.The World Cup finals meeting ends Sunday with overall champions Shiffrin and Hirscher favored for victory in, respectively, a giant slalom and slalom.TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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Honor 20, Honor 20i discounted during Flipkart Big Shopping Days: Check offers and price

first_imgFlipkart will host the Big Shopping Days sale on its platform from July 15, 2019 to July 18, 2019, which is the same time around when Amazon is hosting the Prime Day 2019 sale in India. During the upcoming sale season, the Honor series 20 smartphones — consisting of the Honor 20 and the Honor 20i — will be available at a massive discount on the Indian e-retail platform.During the sale, the 4GB RAM and 128GB internal memory variant of the Honor 20i, which was launched at a price of Rs 14,999 in India, will be available at a flat discount of Rs 1,000 on every prepaid transaction. On the other hand, the 6GB RAM and 128GB internal memory variant of the Honor 20, which was launched at a price of Rs 32,999, will get an additional discount of Rs 3,000 on exchanging an old phone from a leading smartphone brand for a new Honor smartphone. In addition to this, users who purchase any of the two phones – that is either the Honor 20i or the Honor 20 – will get a 10 per cent instant off on using their SBI credit cards for making the purchases.Notably, all the Flipkart Plus customers will get an early bird advantage during the sale. The Flipkart Plus customers will get access to the sale at 8AM on July 15, 2019, the rest of the customers will get access to the deals at 12PM the same day.To give you a quick brief about the specifications, the Honor 20 comes with a 6.26-inch AllView full HD+ display with a resolution of 2340×1080 pixels. It is powered by Kirin 980 processor and it runs on Android 9.0 Pie with Magic UI on top. In terms of the camera, the Honor 20 comes with a 48MP primary lens, a 16MP ultra-wide angle lens, 2MP macro camera and a 2MP ToF camera. On the front, the phone has a 32MP camera. The phone that was launched in May this year comes with 6GBB RAM and 128GB storage space and it is backed by a 3,750mAh battery.advertisementThe Honor 20i, on the other hand, comes with a 6.21-inch FHD+ display. It is powered by a 710 chipset and it runs on Android 9.0 Pie with EMUI 9 on top. The phone sports a triple rear camera setup consisting of a 24MP primary lens, an 8MP wide angle lens and a 2MP depth sensor. In the front, the phone has a 32MP camera. The Honor 20i sports 4GB RAM and 128GB memory and it comes with a 3,400mAh battery.ALSO READ: | Honor 20i quick review: Succeeding the Honor 10 Lite with triple rear camerasALSO READ: | Honor 20 review: The almost perfect smartphoneALSO READ: | Honor 20, Honor 20 Pro launched: Key specs, features, price and India launch detailslast_img read more

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