Kaizer Chiefs wrap up 2013 PSL title

first_imgTop flight titlesChiefs have won South Africa’s PSL three times since it came into being in 1996/97. They were founded in 1970 and won their first South African top flight title in 1974. They have since achieved that feat 11 times in all. 16 May 2013 “I would also like to make special mention of Platinum Stars and Orlando Pirates who made this title race interesting,” he added. They will be presented with the PSL trophy at the last game against the University of Pretoria at Mbombela Stadium in Nelspruit. Kaizer Chiefs’ great Doctor Khumalo told the club’s website that the objective heading into the season was to bring back the Amakhosi’s glory days. He also praised the role played by Baxter, saying: “The coach brought new ideas and made the players believe in themselves. He also made the players realise the importance of donning the gold and black.” In recent years, the race for the PSL title has gone all the way to the final weekend, but Chiefs winning of the league was the earliest since Mamelodi Sundowns won it by 10 points in the 2006/07 season. Ironically, during Baxter’s time in charge of the national team, Chiefs won the PSL in both seasons under Ted Dumitru. Baxter’s influence SuperSport United claimed three titles in succession before the Buccaneers won two in a row: in 2009/10, they finished one point clear of Mamelodi Sundowns; in 2008/09, they edge Pirates on goal difference; in 2007/08, they finished two points clear of Ajax Cape Town. Chiefs received R10-million for winning the league. The league title marked a successful return to South African football for manager Stuart Baxter, Bafana Bafana’s coach in 2004 and 2005, who took over the reins from Vladimir Vermezovic. Baxter is the first England-born coach to lead a team to the PSL title.center_img The Amakhosi had all but wrapped up the title this past weekend, even though they had not been in action, after their closest rivals, Platinum Stars and Orlando Pirates, suffered defeats. Golden Arrows beat Stars 2-1, while a late goal from Mamelodi Sundowns saw Pirates lose 1-0. The title was Chiefs’ first since the 2004/05 season and they matched that season’s record of losing only two matches, although one game must still be played on Saturday, the PSL’s final weekend. Recent PSL seasons Kaizer Chiefs wrapped up the 2012/13 Premier Soccer League (PSL) title with a game to go when they played to a 1-1 draw with SuperSport United at Peter Mokaba Stadium in Polokwane on Wednesday. With a four-point lead, they cannot be caught. Entertaining and beautiful football The Sea Robbers were back to winning ways on Wednesday, crushing bottom club Black Leopards 4-1, but it was too little too late as they came up short of a third title in succession. Last season, 2011/12, Orlando Pirates finished two points ahead of Moroka Swallows. Pirates also claimed the honours in 2010/11, but only on goal difference over Ajax Cape Town. “Kaizer Chiefs have played entertaining and beautiful football this season and this victory is well deserved. The fact that Chiefs led the race from day one is commendable and indicative of the work they have done this season,” the PSL’s Acting CEO, Cambridge Mokanyane, said. Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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Rotary International picks Calgary for 2025 Convention

first_imgRotary International has chosen Calgary to host its 2025 Convention, an annual event which usually attracts between 20,000 and 40,000 people.Co-chair of the host organizing committee Mark Starratt said it’s a victory two years in the making.“We were among 11 worldwide cities that were invited to apply for the possibility and over the course of the last six months, we were whittled down to five,” he said, adding Calgary was the only North American city to be shortlisted.The convention involves Rotarians from over 100 countries gathering for fellowships and strategizing local and international strategies.Starratt said Calgary getting the nod is a result of two key factors.“Number one, the fact that we’ve become a world-class destination and that’s shown really clearly through some of our venues,” he said. “But in addition to that, I can’t reiterate enough the partnership and the spirit of volunteerism that we have in Calgary.”Some of the partners he credits include Meetings + Convention Calgary and the Stampede.“This will be the largest convention in Calgary’s history. It is an amazing accomplishment for our city,” Clark Grue, President and CEO, Meetings + Conventions Calgary, said in a release.Starratt said it’s hard to quantify how much of a boost the local economy will get because it’s unclear just how many Rotarians will attend.But with the convention lasting three to five days at the BMO Centre and the Saddledome, along with attendants contributing to hotels, restaurants, rentals, visiting the mountains and attractions like the Calgary Zoo and Heritage Park, the payoff will be huge.“The multi-millions, the tens of millions,” he said.last_img read more

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Prosecutors Ponzi suspect tried telling wife to hide cash

first_imgBALTIMORE — Prosecutors say a man charged in a $364 million investment scheme planned to tell his wife to drink the “good wine,” stash cash and hide and sell his valuables.The Baltimore Sun reports 53-year-old Kevin Merrill of Towson, Maryland, is accused of trying to show 30-year-old Amanda Merrill a note with the instructions. Prosecutors say he was headed to a jailhouse visit with her when guards found the note in his sock.Prosecutors described the note in conspiracy, obstruction and other charges filed last month against Amanda Merrill. Her attorney declined to comment.U.S. Attorney Robert Hur previously said the scheme entrapped more than 400 victims nationwide. A federal judge had issued a restraining order barring Merrill from selling his sports cars, mansions and designer clothes. He’s pleaded not guilty.___Information from: The Baltimore Sun, http://www.baltimoresun.comThe Associated Presslast_img read more

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Potential Trans Mountain pipeline buyer says it agrees with federal principles

first_imgCALGARY, A.B. – One of the leaders of a First Nations consortium planning to offer $6.8 billion for majority ownership of the Trans Mountain pipeline says federal government principles for Indigenous buyers are “exactly aligned” with its goals.Harrie Vredenburg, a Project Reconciliation executive board member and professor at the University of Calgary’s Haskayne School of Business, says the principles unveiled by Finance Minister Bill Morneau on Monday don’t affect his group’s plan to invite all Indigenous communities in Western Canada to join in a united bid for 51 percent of the pipeline.The four points suggest that discussions of potential Indigenous ownership of the pipeline can proceed only if the communities involved have “meaningful economic participation,” if the deal can proceed in the spirit of reconciliation, and if the resulting entity works to the benefit of all Canadians and goes forward on a commercial basis. Vredenburg says the principles are consistent with messages his organization has shared in meetings with federal department officials over the past five months.He says the project, led by executive chairman Delbert Wapass, a former chief of the Thunderchild First Nation in Saskatchewan, is well-advanced and there have been meetings with investment banks, oil companies and First Nations.Morneau has said the government won’t negotiate the sale of the pipeline it bought for $4.5 billion last summer until after construction of its controversial proposed expansion is “de-risked.”Court-ordered consultations with affected Indigenous groups are expected to wrap up in May, allowing the expansion to go to Ottawa for a decision on approval.last_img read more

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At the vanguard of struggle

first_imgAt the turn of the last century, thousands of thoughtful American women were deeply stirred at the denial of votes to women. Some protested politely in white-gloved Carnegie Hall gatherings. Some spoke on the street corners and were heckled: “Go home and wash your dishes!”, or asked, regardless of age, “Who’s taking care of your children?” One woman was queried, “How would you like to be a man?” She replied tersely, “I wouldn’t. How would you?” Some picketed the White House and burned President Wilson’s fine phrases about democracy in a pot outside his door. They were arrested and sent to a horrible workhouse which they exposed to the world. Also Read – A special kind of bondMaude Malone, a valiant fighter (who at her death was librarian of this newspaper) marched on Broadway when I was a young girl, bearing placards, “Votes for Women” front and back, like a sandwich man and lost her job in a library. Various reasons moved different groups. There were the staunch veterans, who had been ridiculed, ostracised, disowned by families, arrested for attempting to vote. There were rich women who represented the cause “Taxation with Representation.” Professional women resented the obstacles placed in their way in schools and colleges. Working women wanted “Equal pay for equal work,” and laws on hours, safety, child labour, and sanitary regulations. Also Read – Insider threat managementAll were convinced that votes would be a powerful weapon to remedy their grievances. They paraded, held meetings in churches, published papers, pamphlets, and leaflets, lobbied in state legislatures and in Congress. There was every type of organisation. They followed candidates around, forcing them to take a stand, as Mother Bloor described her suffrage work in Ohio. More and more women resented their second-class citizenship, their lack of control over their lives, their children, their property, their wages. A militant movement grew to enormous proportions, which finally won “Votes for Women” in 1920, when the 19th Amendment, known as the Susan B. Anthony Amendment was passed. The leaders of the suffrage movement were predominantly native-born, articulate, and aggressive. But working women were not adequately represented, and their needs were not sufficiently expressed in the official suffrage movement. In fact, the opposition was already evident in some quarters to “protective legislation” which actually restricted the rights of mothers and working women in the name of “equality.” But activism began to develop among working women as early as 1908, not least of which was the East Side demonstration of foreign-born, unorganised working women in New York’s needle trades sweatshops of the day. It was organised by the Women’s Committee of the Socialist Party, headed by Margaret Sanger. She was a nurse and later devoted her life to the advocacy of birth control. By the next year, 1909, 20,000 of these women workers were engaged in a great strike of waistmakers on New York’s East Side. It was called “the girls’ strike.” Eighty per cent of the workers were women, the majority between 17 and 25. They worked 56 hours a week in dirty firetrap buildings, sped up in the season and put out of work completely in slack time. The struggle started in two shops and spread after a meeting in Cooper Union at which a girl striker, Clara Lemlich, said, “I am tired of listening to speakers. I make the motion that a general strike be declared.” She is among those who should be honoured as a founder of unionism in the United States. Because of its working-class origin and these simultaneous struggles, Clara Zetkin, leading German woman Socialist, welcomed American Women’s Day. She had urged a lengthy struggle in Germany to include women’s suffrage in the demands of the Social Democratic Party. There was opposition from some of her male comrades at the time because “women will vote reactionary.” They said that “if you give women the vote, they’ll vote the way the priests say.” At the Congress of the Socialist International in 1910 – with the support from August Bebel of Germany, Vladimir Lenin from Russia, and Big Bill Haywood and others from the US – Zetkin’s proposal that March 8 be designated International Women’s Day was accepted unanimously. It was dedicated to the struggle for the full rights of women. It has spread around the world and is celebrated today in many lands – China, the Soviet Union, the Eastern democracies, France, Italy, and England particularly. (Courtesy: People’s World Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, 1890-1964, known as “The Rebel Girl,” was one of the premier labour activists and leaders of the struggle for women’s equality in the 20th century. She was an organiser for the Industrial Workers of the World, a founding member of the ACLU, and later in life the Chairperson of the Communist Party USA. In this article, originally printed under the headline “For the Rights of Women” in the Daily Worker on March 11, 1954, Flynn discusses the U.S. origins of International Women’s Day)last_img read more

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95 million earmarked for Plaza De Panama and other Balboa Park improvements

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter May 6, 2019 Ed Lenderman, Posted: May 6, 2019 Ed Lenderman center_img 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – A call today for Mayor Faulconer and the City Council to keep the money earmarked for the failed Balboa Park Plaza de Panama Project in the FY-20 budget anyway– because it’s still needed for Park improvements.Gathered in front of a stand-alone public restroom in the Palisades Section of the Park, right by the Air and Space and Automotive Museums, city, civic and cultural leaders, including 3rd District Council Member Chris Ward, said  Mayor Faulconer and the rest of the Council need to appreciate that although the Plaza de Panama Project is dead, the $9.5M dollars for it in the FY-20 proposed budget needs to stay right where it is– i.e.: Balboa Park.Ward:  “The point of today’s press conference is, and the work we’re advocating for the City Council is to make sure we retain that money in Balboa Park for other capital improvement needs.”KUSI has done a number of stories recently on the major improvements needed for the Park’s aging buildings and that the philanthropy of organizations like Friends of the Park is only going to go so far.A perfect example said the people gathered in the rain, of the failure of the City to contribute the money needed to keep San Diego’s Crown Jewel looking reasonably well, as opposed to pristine, is the deplorable conditions of the Park’s bathrooms. Yes, the museums and other attractions, including the Starlight Bowl, are in need of major upgrades, but attention must be called to something as basic as a dilapidated bathroom.The Mayor’s updated numbers for the FY-20 budget come out next week and  everybody at the gathering said we’ll know a lot more then. A public restroom in Balboa Park in deplorable condition, City, civic a nd cultural leaders calling on the Mayor and Council to keep money earmarked for failed Plaza de Panama project in the FY 20 budget dedicated to improvements here, including something as basic as restrooms pic.twitter.com/aZDKK9sCYc— Ed Lenderman (@EdLendermanKUSI) May 6, 2019 $9.5 million earmarked for ‘Plaza De Panama’ and other Balboa Park improvements in 2020 budgetlast_img read more

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