Group discusses campus safety, GLBTQ club

first_imgMembers of Campus Life Council (CLC) discussed updates in campus safety and the proposed GLBTQ student group during their meeting Monday. Student body vice president Brett Rocheleau said NDSP Officer Keri Kei Shibata and University police have expanded the crime-tracking devices available to students. Shibata said NDSP has subscribed to CrimeReports.com, a website the community can use to access up to date information on local crimes. Shibata said students could also create their own accounts on the website to receive email updates. “It’s important for us to be aware of what’s going on around us. Not only by paying attention, looking and listening, but by knowing what types of crimes to look out for,” she said. “This is a user-friendly way for students to know about the info collected by police agencies.” Shibata said the South Bend Police Department is in the process of working with CrimeReports, as well. She said NDSP would suggest a subscription to the Mishawaka Police Department. Student body president Pat McCormick said he and Rocheleau would continue discussions with local law enforcement today. McCormick said the other goal of the meeting was to wrap up discussion on the proposed GLBTQ support group before Senate meets on Wednesday. Sophomore Tom Lienhoop, a representative from the Core Council for Gay and Lesbian, Bisexual and Questioning Students, argued that students on campus need a peer GLBTQ group. “AllianceND unofficially exists on campus and has been denied recognition at least 15 times,” he said. “This creates a negative stigma on campus that deters LGBT students because they don’t feel comfortable.” Lienhoop said the hostile perception causes prospective students to choose other colleges and for some students to transfer out of Notre Dame. “We’re losing excellent students and diversity to other universities,” he said. “(LGBTQ students) feel [excluded] and that they have a poor quality of life on campus.” An official Gay Straight Alliance (GSA) group would allow for more student engagement, as well as give sovereignty to the gay community, he said. “Core only has eight members,” Lienhoop said. “Alliance could have an open membership.” Lienhoop said AllianceND would adhere to Church teaching through acts of service and by promoting human dignity. “AllianceND is committed to service in the South Bend community and has already partnered with local groups,” Lienhoop said. “It could partner with local high schools to offer positive role models there as well.” He said Core and AllianceND could work together to further the Spirit of Inclusion at Notre Dame. “As a member of Core, I can attest they would serve unique spheres at Notre Dame,” Lienhoop said. “They would improve student life, alleviate the bad reputation ND has in this area and help the community.” McCormick said that when a student articulates a need, student government has the responsibility to look into that need. It is a serious priority for student government when a student feels discriminated against, he said.  “The fact is that a GSA or peer-to-peer group would meet a defined need … From a student government point, then, we have to advocate,” he said. McCormick said Senate would vote on the resolution on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Students reach out to city

first_imgUnder the leadership of president Brett Rocheleau, vice president Katie Rose and chief of staff Katie Baker, this year’s student government has worked vigorously to accomplish five specific goals for the University by collaborating with on- and off-campus organizations.   Baker outlined these goals on behalf of the group and discussed its accomplishments and current projects in progress. In order to increase the safety of all students and modernize the University, Baker said members of student government have collaborated with the Call to Action Movement, the 4 to 5 Movement, Core Council and the Office of Student Affairs.   “[Student government] partnered with the Call to Action Movement to advocate for improved resources for historically underrepresented students, deepen the University’s commitment to diversity and implement a one-stop shop for reporting of discriminatory harassment,” Baker said.   The administration also aims to deepen the relationship between students and residents of South Bend through collaboration with campus and local leaders, Baker said.   “Hosting a Community Summit in Downtown South Bend [brought] together city and University leaders in an effort to deepen relationships between local colleges and universities and the South Bend community,” she said.   To accomplish the goal of globalizing the University, Baker said student government has worked with the Career Center and various on-campus institutions to centralize resources regarding international summer and post-graduate opportunities for students.   Although the administration has kept busy working to make progress toward achieving these goals during the first half of the semester, Baker said additional projects and initiatives are slated for the rest of the year. Such initiatives include launching a website to centralize all service opportunities for students, creating an eND Hunger booklet to aid people in the South Bend community who use food stamps to make healthy eating, working with the Office of Auxiliary Operations to implement Domer Dollars at off-campus retailers and working with the community to improve visibility of crosswalks to off-campus destinations.   In response to these concerns, Off-Campus Council president Katie Kehl said the organization will host a “Know Your Rights” question-and-answer session Monday at 4 p.m. in the Montgomery Auditorium of the LaFortune Student Center.   “While geared towards off-campus students, everyone is welcome to hear Brooks Grainger, a lawyer from Krisor & Associates, speak of student off-campus rights,” Kehl said. Students can email any questions they would like answered at the forum to [email protected] Contact Maddie Daly at [email protected]last_img read more

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SMC hosts zumbathon for cancer

first_imgIn honor of breast cancer awareness month, the Saint Mary’s Stand Up to Cancer club held a zumbathon to raise funds for cancer research on Saturday in the Angela Athletic Facility gym. Club president Christi Hutch said about 125 people attended the three-hour dance marathon. In addition to the zumba dancing, the event featured prize raffling and vendors selling various products to support individuals fighting cancer in the South Bend area. Twenty zumba instructors from the area volunteered to direct the exercises for participants. To break up the three consecutive hours of dancing, Troop ND and the Irish Dance team performed at the event’s halfway point, Hutch said.    “This event is fantastic because it incorporates the involvement of the South Bend community, as well as the involvement of the student communities at Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame,” Hutch said. “We have come together today to fight for a good cause.” Leah Ramaekers, club historian, said she admires her organization’s work. “This is the club’s second annual zumbathon, where 100 percent of our proceeds will go to the ‘National Organization to Stand Up to Cancer,’” she said.   Club vice president Julia Ritter said the fundraiser’s popularity makes it a successful fundraiser. “The zumbathon worked so well last year that we’ve become obsessed with zumba and therefore, we’ve decided to keep doing it as our fundraiser,” Ritter said.   Saint Mary’s alumna Kimi Troy, who graduated with a degree in English Writing, helped coordinate the event. Troy said she presented the idea of holding a zumba charity event to the student activities board as a way to connect with the community and fundraise for the national “Stand Up to Cancer” organization.  “I have been involved with the program ever since,” Troy said.   Allison Lukomski, another club member, said her own dancing ability had nothing to do with her enjoyment of the event.  “Even though I am a bad dancer, it really doesn’t matter if I am a good dancer or not; I am dancing to make a difference,” she said. “Cancer runs in my family and because of it, the fight is more personal to me … I want to combat it in any way possible.” participant  Olivia Jackson said. She said she would definitely recommend this event to friends in the future.   “Zumba is a great workout, and why not give back to the community at the same time?” she said. Hutch said approximately $1,100 was raised at the end of the Zumbathon. Contact Chelsey Fattal at [email protected]last_img read more

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Tens of thousands of Irish fans attend Blue-Gold Game

first_imgCaroline Genco | The Observer Hundreds of fans poured into Notre Dame Stadium on Saturday to watch the Irish scrimmage in the annual Blue-Gold Spring Game, a tradition that began 85 years ago.Students and fans threw tailgates, dressed up in Notre Dame gear and shouted traditional cheers throughout the game. Officer Tim McCarthy with the Indiana State Police shared his first joke of 2014 with the lively crowd. The official attendance number was 27,986.John Rydberg, a freshman in O’Neill Hall, said, “My friends and I decided to go all out for this game. It didn’t matter at all that it was just a scrimmage. In the end, it’s more about school spirit and having fun than anything else.”For many seniors, the game represented their last Notre Dame football game as students.Senior Kelsie Corriston said, “It was a little nostalgic to be there, realizing that I would never watch a Notre Dame football game as a student again. But I will most definitely be back in the years to come to cheer for the Fighting Irish.”The Shirt 2014, which was unveiled Friday, was worn by band members who played traditional favorites. This year’s Blue-Gold Game marked the last time the Irish would play on the grass field; after commencement weekend, the University plans to lay down FieldTurf to replace the current natural grass field.Michael Yu | The Observer A portion of the proceeds of the game support the Notre Dame Club of St. Joseph Valley, who sponsor scholarships for area high school students attending Notre Dame next year, according to UND.com. The names of those students were announced during a halftime ceremony.A number of visiting prospective students also came out for the game to experience Notre Dame football for the first time.Julia Frank, a senior in high school planning to attend Notre Dame next fall, spent the weekend touring campus.“It was such a great experience to spend the weekend here,” Julia said. “Now I’m so excited for the fall to come. I almost don’t want to go back to high school.”Not all students were able to make it out to the game, however. Admission was free for students.Freshman Ruth Cooper said, “I have two tests and two papers this week, and I knew I needed to spend Saturday studying.”“Sometimes you just have to prioritize. Yes, football is fun, but in the end, we are here to get an education, and that always comes first for me,” freshman Megan Pogue said.last_img read more

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Vigil to remember lives of slain Muslim-Americans

first_imgPhoto courtesy of Muslim Student Association “Vigil for Peace,” an interfaith prayer service planned for Monday night, will honor the lives of three Muslim-Americans killed in a shooting last Tuesday in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.The service, sponsored by the Muslim Students Association (MSA) and Campus Ministry, will take place Monday at 9 p.m. in the lounge of the Coleman-Morse Center.The vigil will remember Deah Shaddy Barakat, a 23-year-old University of North Carolina (UNC) student; his 21-year-old wife, Yusor Mohammad Abu-Salha, a graduate of North Carolina State University; and her sister, 19-year-old Razan Mohammad Abu-Salha, a student at North Carolina State University. They were killed in their apartment near UNC on Tuesday evening.The alleged shooter, Craig Stephen Hicks, was charged with three counts of first-degree murder. On Thursday, the F.B.I. began an inquiry, which includes exploring the possibility that the act was a religiously-motivated hate crime.Sophomore Faisal Shariff, MSA’s vice president of social affairs, said the purpose of the service is for people of multiple faiths to unite against violence and begin a sustained discussion of issues of violence.“The death of these three students is really tragic, and the last few months have been smattered with these violent acts,” he said. “It’s a chance to come together and make a stand against violence everywhere. All lives matter, as the hashtag goes, and just to remember these people, because they’re regular people, just like any of us. It’s not right, and it shouldn’t have happened at all.”The service will include welcome remarks by Campus Ministry director Fr. Pete McCormick and sophomore Hind Ourahou; a reading of Al-Fatiha, the opening verses of the Quran; and a legacy, or reflection, on the lives of the victims.Graduate student Aamir Ahmed Khan, MSA’s former president and a current member, said in the legacy, students will hear about Barakat and his work as a dentistry student.“He was very active in his local community,” Khan said. “He was collecting dental supplies for charity purposes, so I think many students at Notre Dame can relate to that. They have dedicated their lives to service and volunteership. These are three young people, and their lives are gone, their passions, their dreams.”The service will also include personal testimonies and a call for action. Professor of Islamic studies Ebrahim Moosa will reflect on today’s interfaith situation. Attendees can offer personal intentions and sign a sympathy card for the families.A. Rashied Omar, a research scholar of Islamic studies and peacebuilding at the Kroc Institute, and Fr. Robert Dowd, an assistant professor of political science, will read from the Quran and Bible, respectively. Dowd said he will read a passage from the Gospel of Luke, in which Jesus gives his ultimate commandments to love God and neighbor.“Jesus doesn’t define neighbor very narrowly; he defines neighbor very broadly,” Dowd said. “In his example, he tells a parable of a good Samaritan. It was the Samaritan who was an outsider, but it was this outsider, not the priest, not the Levite, not the people who were the insiders – it was an outsider who offered support.“God’s love works through all of us, and we’re all called to do our best to love one another and seek to understand one another regardless of faith background.”Dowd said interfaith prayer is a way to find common ground among faiths.“It’s in the context of prayer that we realize how much we have in common,” Dowd said. “Muslims believe God is a God of love and a God of justice and a God of peace, and [Christians] believe the same. In the context of prayer, we have an awareness of this. God speaks to us all in the context of prayer. We open ourselves. That’s what prayer is all about.”On Feb. 11, several Notre Dame students and faculty attended a community-wide prayer service at the Islamic Society of Michiana for both the Chapel Hill shooting victims and Kayla Mueller, an American aid worker who was taken hostage by ISIS in Syria and killed in February.Khan said Monday’s service will continue to provide support to Muslim students on campus.“We want to channel the frustration or the concerns or any worries [and show] that the greater ND community is standing with the Muslim students,” he said. “I think it’s a wonderful opportunity to show interfaith solidarity, that we are all one and that human life has dignity.”Tags: Aamir Ahmed Khan, Campus Ministry, Faisal Shariff, Interfaith prayer service, muslim students association, Muslim-Americans, Robert Dowd, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Vigil for Peacelast_img read more

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Breakfast series connects South Bend, students

first_imgThe Center for Social Concerns (CSC) is hosting a way for South Bend community partners, students and faculty to collaborate in a much more casual setting: breakfast.The breakfast series, called “Food for Thought Breakfast Series: Healthy Neighborhoods,” occurs four times over the academic year, Danielle Wood, assistant director for community-based research and impact at the CSC, said. The second breakfast of this academic year is Wednesday from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. at Near Northwest Neighborhood. Wood said the breakfast series was launched three years ago.“We need more informal time, non-programmed time for networking,” she said. “This came out of me thinking of ‘Well, what would be a way that would be 90 percent the networking and 10 percent more formal?’”Wood said she was awarded a one-year grant to start the breakfast series. After the year was over, the organizations involved in the series wanted to keep the event going. Today, she said, the event is fully funded by the partners.“The primary aim of the event since its inception was to build thicker networks into the community and across the different academic institutions for shared community problem-solving with organizations,” Wood said.Heidi Beidinger-Burnett, a faculty member at the Eck Institute for Global Health, will be one of the discussion leaders this Wednesday. Beidinger-Burnett helps run lead poisoning prevention activities on behalf of a group of Notre Dame faculty.“The most important thing is that people are in the know,” she said. “The reason that this is so critically important to me is because lead poisoning is forever damaging for children. Even at very, very low exposure rates, [for] children’s neurological and physiological systems … there can be lifelong damage.”Beidinger-Burnett said this breakfast is the cross-section of community members, leaders and organizations in South Bend. The event, she said, acts as an opportunity to talk about what is working in the community as well as the challenges it faces. “There is a tremendous amount of value of bringing people together and collaborating that way,” Beidinger-Burnett said. “We’re all networking trying to improve the quality of life of people that live in South Bend and St. Joseph County.”To further emphasize the goal of strengthening the local community, all the food during the breakfast is from local businesses, Wood said.“We try to locally source all the food as much as possible because it’s part of the whole notion of building the local economy,” she said.Students who are thinking about doing a thesis or capstone project are welcome to come to the breakfast, Wood said. The event is not meant to be informative, she said, but rather, provide a platform for people to form partnerships with others interested community-based research.“It creates partnerships for solving complex problems better,” she said. “A community partner is an educator as much as your faculty member is. They can help you frame your topic meaningfully. You don’t think of your topic in a vacuum, you think of it in collaboration with those that might use the information.“The value of community based research is that it’s a partnership and you get better information and better use of your information when you’re done because of it.”Tags: Breakfast series, Center for Social Concerns, community based reasearch, Eck Institute for Global Healthlast_img read more

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Faculty discusses new Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science degree

first_imgAt the beginning of March, the College of Arts and Letters announced that it would be introducing a Bachelor of Arts in Computer Science (BACS), distinct from the Bachelors of Computer Science (BCS) already offered through the College of Engineering.Dr. Aaron Striegel, a professor in the College of Engineering and the first director of the new BACS, said the program is an attempt to allow students with interests in computer science and the humanities study both fields and still graduate in four years.“The Bachelor of Arts sort of arose out of the fact that we had a fair amount of students who wanted to double major,” Striegel said. “And because of how heavily structured the BS and CS is, [it] was often fairly difficult unless you had a fairly significant amount of advanced placement, but even then, it was still a pretty heavy lift.”Though the program was announced just last month, Striegel says the program has been in the works for the last few years.“This had been in the works or under consideration for a fair amount of time, [and] I think the the reason why this had happened now is that sort of things aligned appropriately and we’d seen sort of as a department continued interest in the digital humanities,” Striegel said. “This was kind of a culmination of multiple years of work all coming together into this program: the data science, new CDT program, all kind of helped pave the way in terms of some of the partnerships that had gone on.”BACS programs are becoming more popular around the country, Dr. Patrick Flynn, the chair of the College of Computer Science and Engineering, said. Flynn said Notre Dame looked at other schools as a guideline for implementing the program.“We certainly did a lot of background reading about how BA programs are executed at other universities and certainly our BACS program has a lot in common with a national movement,” Flynn said. “…There are some universities that really emphasize the other discipline sciences. We and a number of schools are focusing more on the arts and humanities. The idea of combining computer science with some other discipline has been looked at in a lot of different ways and the initial collaboration that makes the most sense to us is the one with Arts and Letters.”The new program, though housed in the college of Arts and Letters, will still feature College of Engineering computer courses and does not have any plans to have exclusive classes from the rest of the computer science program.“Right now we don’t envision any particular classes [that] are only for BACS students,” Striegel said. “We’ll probably have some programs or speakers that might be targeted at the BACS students, but those will be open to all students to attend,so we don’t envision restricting anything along the way or having degree-specific coursework.”BACS students being required to take some of the same classes as the current BCS students paired with the current number of faculty is creating a bottleneck limiting the number of students who can participate in the program, Flynn said. This in turn may limit future interdisciplinary programs with the other colleges.“We’ll probably be working with other colleges down the line, [but] it’s going to depend on having the ability to identify resources so that we can meet the courses and teach the students that enroll in them, with the faculty that we have or grow the faculty to accommodate more students,” Flynn said. “The major constraint on the program right now is that our courses are quite full, and so we have to create new sections of existing courses of required courses that are required of the BS in computer science, the BS in computer engineering and the BA in computer science. There are 11 classes like that, so if we can get the staffing, we can definitely grow our capacity to teach and that means we can offer more interdisciplinary programs down the road.”Due to the constraints on the program, there are only a limited number of slots available to those who apply, making the application process competitive, Striegal said.“It involves writing a fairly short essay of why do you want to do the BACS, [and] what you want to bring from Arts and Letters together with computer science; basically, why does this degree make sense for you, coupled with your past coursework that you had done in the freshmen of your fall year and any programming experience that you might have as well,” Striegel said. “For both the the class of 2023 and the class of 2024, we’re envisioning somewhere on the order of 10 to 15 slots, and then the class of 2025, we’ll probably evaluate what the sizing might be, probably next spring.”The program made decisions on who the first batch of BACS students will be as of the first week of April. The class of 2024 will be able to apply for the program in the spring of next year.Tags: bachelor of arts, College of Arts and Letters, Computer sciencelast_img read more

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Sunny But Very Cool Weekend In The Works

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) JAMESTOWN – High Pressure will firmly be in control for the weekend, although temperatures will be well below average.Saturday and Sunday will feature plenty of sunshine both days. However temperatures both days will struggle to make it out of the upper-50’s. Some spots may make it into the low-60’s.For Saturday night, mainly clear skies will allow temperatures to plumit to the low-30’s. Another round of frost and freeze warnings are likely. If you have plants outside it will be best to bring them in or cover them up.Dry weather will remain pretty much in control for much of the upcoming week. This means lots of sunshine. Temperatures will be on a slow incline with highs Monday and Tuesday in the low to mid-60’s, eventually reaching 70 by mid-week. The next best chance for rain looks to not arrive until late week around Thursday.WNYNewsNow is a proud Ambassador for the NOAA Weather-Ready Nation program.last_img read more

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Vanessa Williams to Join the Cast of After Midnight

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on June 29, 2014 Star Files Set against a narrative of Langston Hughes’ poetry, After Midnight celebrates Duke Ellington’s years at Harlem’s famed Cotton Club using his original arrangements and performed by a world-class big band of 17 musicians. Along with Lang, the cast currently includes Dule Hill as host, Tony winner Adriane Lenox, Julius “iGlide” Chislom, Virgil J. Gadson, Karine Plantadit and Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards. Related Shows View Comments Fantasia Barrinocenter_img Vanessa Williams Williams received her Tony nomination for playing the Witch in Into the Woods. Her other Broadway credits include The Trip to Bountiful, Kiss of the Spider-Woman and Sondheim on Sondheim. She is well-known for her three-time Emmy nominated performance as Wilhemina Slater on TV’s Ugly Betty, as well as her roles as Renee Perry on Desperate Housewives and Olivia Duran on 666 Park Avenue. Her film credits include Soul Food, Eraser, Dance With Me, Shaft and Hannah Montana: The Movie. As a recording artist, her many hits include “Save the Best For Last,” “You Can’t Run,” “The Right Stuff,” “Dreamin’,” “Runnin’ Back to You” and “Colors of the Wind.” After Midnight Tony nominee Vanessa Williams is the latest special guest star set to board the Duke Ellington musical After Midnight. Williams will begin performances at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on April 1 and play through May 11. The musical revue, directed and choreographed by Warren Carlyle, started previews on October 18 with Grammy winner Fantasia Barrino the first in a rotating list of stars. Grammy winner K.D. Lang is currently headlining the show through March 9. Grammy winners Toni Braxton and Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds will follow as special guest star March 18 through March 30.last_img read more

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Beautiful Duo Jarrod Spector & Anika Larsen Are Taking Your Questions!

first_img Star Files Who is the next duo to take a seat on the comfy Broadway.com Ask a Star couch? Beautiful favorites Jarrod Spector and Anika Larsen! The talented twosome plays songwriting husband-and-wife pair Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil in the new musical, and they’re just as adorable offstage as they are at the Stephen Sondheim Theatre! Want proof? Ask them anything in the box below, then tune in to Broadway.com to see them answer your questions. Want to know Larsen’s most embarrassing audition story? What about Spector’s favorite gift from a Jersey Boys fan? Or have you ever wondered what Beautiful headliner Jessie Mueller is really like? Ask them now! <a data-cke-saved-href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/z12bcc8i0s4i7zf/" href="https://broadway.wufoo.com/forms/z12bcc8i0s4i7zf/">Fill out my Wufoo form!</a> Jarrod Spector Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on Oct. 27, 2019center_img Anika Larsen View Comments Beautiful: The Carole King Musicallast_img read more

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