Vanessa Williams to Join the Cast of After Midnight

first_img Show Closed This production ended its run on June 29, 2014 Star Files Set against a narrative of Langston Hughes’ poetry, After Midnight celebrates Duke Ellington’s years at Harlem’s famed Cotton Club using his original arrangements and performed by a world-class big band of 17 musicians. Along with Lang, the cast currently includes Dule Hill as host, Tony winner Adriane Lenox, Julius “iGlide” Chislom, Virgil J. Gadson, Karine Plantadit and Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards. Related Shows View Comments Fantasia Barrinocenter_img Vanessa Williams Williams received her Tony nomination for playing the Witch in Into the Woods. Her other Broadway credits include The Trip to Bountiful, Kiss of the Spider-Woman and Sondheim on Sondheim. She is well-known for her three-time Emmy nominated performance as Wilhemina Slater on TV’s Ugly Betty, as well as her roles as Renee Perry on Desperate Housewives and Olivia Duran on 666 Park Avenue. Her film credits include Soul Food, Eraser, Dance With Me, Shaft and Hannah Montana: The Movie. As a recording artist, her many hits include “Save the Best For Last,” “You Can’t Run,” “The Right Stuff,” “Dreamin’,” “Runnin’ Back to You” and “Colors of the Wind.” After Midnight Tony nominee Vanessa Williams is the latest special guest star set to board the Duke Ellington musical After Midnight. Williams will begin performances at the Brooks Atkinson Theatre on April 1 and play through May 11. The musical revue, directed and choreographed by Warren Carlyle, started previews on October 18 with Grammy winner Fantasia Barrino the first in a rotating list of stars. Grammy winner K.D. Lang is currently headlining the show through March 9. Grammy winners Toni Braxton and Kenny “Babyface” Edmonds will follow as special guest star March 18 through March 30.last_img read more

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Top scholar

first_imgFranklin West, a University of Georgia assistant professor of animal and dairy science in the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, has been named one of the nation’s top scholars under 40 by Diverse: Issues in Higher Education magazine. West, who is on the steering committee for the UGA Regenerative Bioscience Center, works closely with center director Steve Stice, a Georgia Research Alliance Eminent Scholar. They recently discovered that pluripotent stem cells can be used in pigs without causing tumors. His research is now focusing on how pig stem cells can develop into cells of the central nervous system to ultimately help patients who have suffered from stroke or traumatic brain injury. To date, there is only one FDA approved treatment for stroke and none for traumatic brain injury. Using a pig stem cell therapy model, West and collaborator Dr. Simon Platt, a UGA College of Veterinary Medicine neurosurgeon, are working to unlock the secrets of how stem cells can effectively and safely treat human patients. “Frank is a rising star, and this award is well deserved,” Stice said. “At an early stage in his career, he has already demonstrated strengths in intellect, teaching, research and collegiality.”West received a bachelor’s of science degree in biology from Morehouse College and a doctorate in stem cell biology from UGA. Prior to joining UGA in 2009, he was a consultant with Aruna Biomedical, an Athens-based biotechnology company.West was a Minority Access to Research Careers U-Star Research Fellow and a David and Lucille Packard Research Fellow at Morehouse College. He has been published in several national and international scientific peer-reviewed journals for cellular biology.West, along with 11 other scholars under the age of 40, was featured on Jan. 5 in the special Emerging Scholars edition of Diverse: Issues in Higher Education as the magazine kicked off 2012 by recognizing rising stars in the academy. Each scholar was selected based on research, educational background, publishing record, teaching record, competitiveness of field of study and uniqueness of field of study.“Dr. West is a dynamic scientist working in one of the most exciting and promising areas of biology,” said J. Scott Angle, dean and director of the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences. “I can’t wait to see what he does in his career, and I know we are all going to be better off because of his efforts. Few scientists have gotten off to such a good start to their careers.” The “Emerging Scholars” for 2012 are:• Magdalena Bezanilla, associate professor of biology, University of Massachusetts, Amherst• Majel Boxer, assistant professor of Native American and indigenous studies, Fort Lewis College• Kristian Brown, adjunct assistant professor of biomedical engineering, Wayne State University• Alexes Harris, associate professor of sociology, University of Washington• Jenny Lee, associate professor of higher education, Center for the Study of Higher Education, University of Arizona• Karen An-Hwei Lee, professor and chair, department of English, Vanguard University of Southern California• Geanncarlo Lugo-Villarino, postdoctoral fellow, Institut de Pharmacologie et de Biologie Structurale, Toulouse, France• Osagie K. Obasogie, associate professor of law, University of California, Hastings• Mariel Vazquez, associate professor of mathematics, San Francisco State University• Franklin West, assistant professor of animal and dairy science, University of Georgia• Byron Williams, assistant professor of computer science and engineering, Mississippi State University• Frances Williams, associate professor of engineering, Norfolk State Universitylast_img read more

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Odd twist in TB alert: Patient is TB researcher’s son-in-law

first_imgMay 31, 2007 (CIDRAP News) – As information piled up in the case of a man with a rare and dangerous form of tuberculosis (TB) who took multiple international air trips, it was revealed today that he is a lawyer and the son-in-law of a microbiologist who studies TB at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).The patient, who has extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR TB), was identified in news reports today as Andrew H. Speaker, 31, an Atlanta lawyer. This afternoon, the CDC issued a news release in which Robert C. Cooksey, a research microbiologist in the CDC’s Division of Tuberculosis Elimination, announced that he is Speaker’s father-in-law and said Speaker did not contract TB from him or from CDC labs.Speaker became the subject of the CDC’s first forcible isolation order since 1963 after he returned to the United States from a wedding trip to Europe that involved not only two transatlantic flights but also several international flights in Europe. His case has also triggered a hunt for airline passengers who may have been exposed to XDR TB.The CDC announced on May 29 that Speaker, acting against medical advice, had flown from Atlanta to Paris on May 12 and from Prague to Montreal on May 24, thereby putting dozens of fellow passengers at risk for the dangerous infection. At that point health officials knew he had multidrug-resistant TB but didn’t know it was XDR TB, according to the CDC.After he returned from Canada to the United States by car, the CDC reached him by phone, and he voluntarily went to a hospital in New York City, where he was ordered into isolation. The CDC subsequently flew him to Atlanta, where he was held in isolation at a hospital. A CBS News report today said Speaker has been taken to National Jewish Medical and Research Center in Denver, which specializes in respiratory diseases.Cooksey, in the CDC statement today, said he is a 32-year CDC veteran and studies a wide range of bacteria, including those that cause TB. “As part of my job, I am regularly tested for TB,” he stated. “I do not have TB, nor have I ever had TB. My son-in-law’s TB did not originate from myself or the CDC’s labs, which operate under the highest levels of biosecurity.”I wasn’t involved in any decision my son-in-law made regarding his travel, nor did I ever act as a CDC official or in an official CDC capacity with respect to any of the events of the past weeks,” he continued.”As a parent, frequent traveler, and biologist, I well appreciate the potential harm that can be caused by diseases like TB. I would never knowingly put my daughter, friends or anyone else at risk from such a disease.”XDR TB is described as TB that is resistant to the two most important first-line TB drugs (isoniazid and rifampin) and the two most important second-line drugs (a fluoroquinolone and an injectable agent—amikacin, kanamycin, or capreomycin), according to the CDC. The agency says 49 cases of XDR TB occurred in the United States between 1993 and 2006.Both regular TB and XDR TB are believed to spread when TB bacilli from a person with the disease become aerosolized as a result of coughing, sneezing, speaking, or singing, the agency said. The bacilli can float in the air for several hours, and those who breathe them in can become infected. Patients may survive the disease if they have excellent medical care, but it is often fatal where medical care is limited, the CDC has said.TB manifests itself slowly, and Speaker remains in apparent good health, according to the CDC and news reports. Officials said his infectiousness appears to be low (but not zero), since TB bacilli have not yet shown up in microscopic examination of his sputum.His infection was discovered in January when a chest x-ray obtained for unrelated reasons revealed a lesion in his right lung, CDC officials said during a news briefing yesterday. Subsequently a culture revealed that he had TB, and initial drug treatment proved ineffective, said Dr. Martin Cetron, director of the CDC’s Division of Global Migration and Quarantine.In a meeting with Fulton County health officials and his doctors on May 10, Speaker was told that he had multidrug-resistant TB and was advised not to make his planned trip to Europe, Cetron said yesterday. But because of what CDC officials have called “compelling personal reasons,” he made the trip anyway. From an interview with the patient, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported yesterday that the purpose of the man’s trip was his wedding and honeymoon.While he was in Europe—on or around May 22—the CDC learned that Speaker had XDR TB, Cetron said yesterday. That led to frantic attempts to reach him and keep him from taking any more commercial flights. But officials failed to intercept him until he was back in the United States.Focus is on transatlantic flightsDuring yesterday’s briefing, the CDC filled in many details about Speaker’s airline flights and the overall sequence of events.Officials said the patient took five flights within Europe, in addition to his two transatlantic flights. However, the agency is focusing mainly on contacting those who were on the transatlantic flights, because the risk of TB transmission in short flights is much lower than on long flights.Previous investigations showed that “flights shorter than 8 hours in duration did not pose a significant risk, and so we’re really concentrating on those prolonged flights,” Cetron said.As reported previously, Speaker flew from Atlanta to Paris on Air France Flight 385 and from Montreal to Prague on Czech Air 0104.The Air France flight had 433 passengers and 18 crew members and may have lasted as long as 13 hours, Cetron reported. According to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, passengers in the two rows fore and aft of a TB patient are most at risk for infection. That means about 40 to 50 passengers from that flight, plus the crew, are at risk, Cetron said.He said the patient probably sat “somewhere around row 51,” but investigators were still trying to pin down his seat number yesterday.Concerning the flight from Prague to Montreal, Canadian officials have obtained a passenger manifest and determined that the patient sat in seat 12C, Cetron said. He said the flight had 191 passengers and 9 crew members, and about 30 passengers would have been in the at-risk part of the cabin. That flight also lasted more than 8 hours.The CDC hopes to reach as many of the passengers as possible and advise them to undergo an initial TB test and a follow-up test 2 months later. But officials said that getting the passenger lists from the airlines and then tracking the passengers down is a slow, difficult process.As of yesterday, the agency hadn’t succeeded in finding any of the at-risk passengers through its own investigation, though some had begun to come forward as a result of news reports on the case, Cetron said.He noted that the CDC is currently working on new quarantine rules that would enable the agency to access electronic passenger manifests within 24 hours after a plane’s arrival. The regulations were proposed in November 2005 and have gone through a public comment period. “We hope to expedite and bring [the regulations] to closure very quickly,” Cetron said.Also during the briefing, Cetron listed the shorter flights Speaker took while in Europe: Paris to Athens on May 14, Air France 1232; Athens to a Greek island on May 16, Olympic Air 560; Nikonos to Athens on May 21, Olympic Air 655; Athens to Rome on May 21, Olympic Air 239; and Rome to Prague on May 24, Czech Air 0727.Many questions during the briefing focused on why Speaker wasn’t prevented from flying to Europe in the first place and why public health officials didn’t try to stop him before he returned to the United States.”I think there’s a difference of opinion about whether anybody condoned his travel,” Cetron said. “I think it’s very clear from the conversations we had with the health department that they clearly told him not to travel.” He said a “written affirmation” of the no-travel advice was prepared, but it arrived after he had left.Cetron said a CDC official reached the patient by phone when he was in Rome, told him about the XDR TB findings, and made clear in “no uncertain terms” that he should not fly commercially. At that point the agency was considering sending a plane to fly the man back to the US, among other options, he reported.But when a former CDC official who now works for an Italian health agency went to the patient’s hotel to give him more information, he was already gone, Cetron said.”It’s very unfortunate that this whole situation wasn’t prevented on the front end,” he commented.See also:Nov 2005 CIDRAP News story on proposed CDC quarantine rules pertaining to travelershttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/influenza/panflu/news/nov2205travelers.htmllast_img read more

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Multi-asset a ‘clear growth opportunity’, State Street survey shows

first_imgAndrew Wilson, head of asset manager solutions for the UK at State Street, said: “An overwhelming majority see growth coming from multi-asset solutions, and changes in investor demand in general.”Multi-asset was cited by 67% as the investment strategy type that will most drive growth over the next three years.The next most favoured strategy was traditional actively managed equity, at 17% of the respondents, although there were regional variations: for example, multi-asset was cited as the key growth area by 80% of Australian firms, whereas only 53% of UK firms agreed – here, 30% believe traditional actively managed equity will be the greatest source of growth.Clients are moving to outcome-orientated solutions – cash-plus, inflation-plus or specific income stream-generation, for example – rather than traditional beta-focused products, Wilson observed.“The shift from DFB to DC is certainly part of the explanation for this,” he added.However, 74% of managers said few firms are “currently equipped to thrive when offering multi-asset solutions”.This is reflected in a strong focus on risk management, with 36% planning significant investment in data integration, 39% in performance analytics and 48% in risk analytics.Addressing talent gaps will be a focus on moderate or significant investment for 53% of managers, while 64% will be investing in skills training.This investment will happen against a difficult background for revenue and profit growth – despite the anticipated growth in assets under management.“Increasing pressure on fees and the rising cost of both talent and regulation is squeezing margins, leading to a lot of activity to improve operating efficiencies,” Wilson said.More than half of those surveyed saw significant opportunities to deliver this from within their organisations, while 28% looked to acquisition as a major opportunity to improve operating efficiency.Europe is ripe for a consolidation of fund products, Wilson suggested.The survey of 300 senior executives at asset management firms – split evenly between North America, Europe and Asia Pacific – was conducted during April and May 2014 by the Financial Times Group’s FT Remark, on behalf of State Street. Asset managers are bullish on the growth of their businesses and expect that growth to be driven by competition over more home-market demand for outcomes-based investment solutions such as multi-asset products, according to a global survey unveiled by State Street in London.Just over half of the 300 managers surveyed believe growth for their business will be strongly positive over the next 12 months.While 47% plan to expand into new countries or regions over the next three years, three-quarters see their existing country markets as the greatest growth opportunity – with 85% citing regulatory barriers as the number-one challenge when expanding into new markets.North American managers expect most growth in existing products and markets, whereas European managers see the greatest opportunities in new products and markets – although Germany-based managers were the least likely to be looking abroad for growth.last_img read more

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Nortel scheme moves to next judgment after £340m win in Canadian case

first_imgTrustees of the Nortel UK Pension Scheme secured £340m (€430m) in deficit funding from its now-defunct Canadian sponsor but failed in a bid to force through a financial support directive (FSD) for greater funding.In a case argued in the province of Ontario, trustees, supported by the UK Pension Protection Fund (PPF), challenged Canadian company Nortel Networks Limited (NNL) for funding to repair a deficit after Nortel’s insolvency in 2009.The UK arm of Nortel supported a 40,000 member defined benefit (DB) scheme, which had a £2bn deficit at the time of insolvency.The Canadian communications business triggered one of the world’s largest insolvencies in 2009, sending all global subsidiaries into administration, chiefly in Canada, the US and Europe. Trustees, the UK pensions regulator (TPR) and the PPF launched a legal case against administrators of the US and Canadian businesses to secure funding for the UK DB scheme and avoid its entering the lifeboat fund.Legal proceedings over the distribution of monies created by the sale of NNL’s assets are ongoing, with JP Morgan holding a $7bn (€5.6bn) sum as US and Canadian courts decide how to distribute assets to creditors.In the latest case in Ontario, trustees and the PPF challenged NNL’s administrators, looking to secure two separate levels of funding based on written guarantees from NNL to its UK DB scheme.They also made a financial claim based on TPR’s ability to issue an FSD – a UK legal claim on assets to support underfunded pension schemes – against NNL.The Ontario Superior Court of Justice ruled that one of the guarantees, valued at £340m, could be upheld but ruled out a smaller $150m guarantee and gave no credence to the trustees’ claims based on the FSD.Judge Justice Newbould said issuing the FSD against NNL would be unreasonable but did not venture whether a court of appeal would agree with his judgment.However, the Court acknowledged FSDs should be treated as appropriate claims in Canadian insolvency proceedings, after local administrators argued against this.The value of the FSD was unquantifiable at the time of the ruling given the implications of outstanding cases in the US and Canada over the distribution of assets.The FSD claim value would depend on the distribution of the $7bn in assets to claimants in Europe, compared with those in the US and Canada.Should European claimants fare well in any future decision, the value of the FSD would decrease, and vice versa.Lawyers representing trustees and the PPF welcomed the clarity of the secured funding and the credibility of FSDs in Canadian insolvency practices.Angela Dimsdale Gill, Hogan Lovells partner and lead litigator for the PPF and trustees, said her clients would carefully consider the next steps on the matters lost in the case.“The trustee and PPF have reluctantly but determinedly been part of [Nortel litigation] and continue to do their best to represent the interests of UK pensioners,” she said.“It is important not to have knee-jerked reactions, but, of course, there are some aspects of the judgment we find disappointing.”A spokesman for the PFF added: “[The] judgment provided greater clarity for the amounts being pursued by the scheme. We continue to consider the judgment and the next steps available to us and the trustees.”The remainder of the case now rests on judgments from US and Canadian courts, expected next year.Complications have arisen over conflicting challenges from Europe, the US and Canada, including pension schemes and bondholders, for the $7bn of assets.US and Canadian courts are now sitting simultaneously, but not conjointly, to reach a ruling based on two sovereign laws – an unprecedented legal situation.Gill said: “The critical decision on allocation will come next year. The claims process is inter-linked with the allocation dispute, and we will not really know where the scheme has ended up until it is all over.”The original article was amended to correct the currency for the smaller claim from £150m to $150m. Apologies for the mistake.last_img read more

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Stray bullet hurts 4-year-old boy

first_imgAccording to the police, the suspectattempted to shoot a dog but instead hit the victim who was playing with hiselder brother outside their house around 4:30 p.m. on Dec. 1. Habagat admitted that he tried to fireat the dog that allegedly killed his chicken. The suspect was identified as NoelHabagat, also resident of the said village, a police report showed. He turned himself in to the Sara PoliceStation and vowed to pay the victim’s hospital bill./PNcenter_img The victim, whose name was withheld byauthorities, sustained a gunshot wound on the left foot. He received medicaltreatment at the Sara district hospital. ILOILO City – A four-year-old boy landedin a hospital after getting hit by a stray bullet in Baragay Del Castillo,Sara, Iloilo. last_img read more

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Laurel K9 unit tracks fleeing subject

first_imgPhoto from Laurel PD FacebookFRANKLIN COUNTY, Ind. — Laurel Police K9 Diablo, K9 Officer Ellis, and Officer Stewart assisted the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office with a track of a fleeing subject wanted on a felony warrant at a residence off Saltwell Rd.According to the Laurel Police Department, K9 Diablo tracked the suspect back to a barn lot located off of Fairfield Causeway Rd, where K9 Diablo led officers to a horse trailer with sleeping quarters inside it.The suspect was found hiding in the bunk under blankets and bedding.The suspect surrendered without further incident and was taken into custody.The suspect surrendered without further incident and was taken into custody.The name has not yet been released as the investigation is still ongoing.last_img read more

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Ruiz tries to rally Fulham

first_img Martin Jol’s side travel to Sky Bet Championship promotion hopefuls Leicester in the Capital One Cup fourth round on Tuesday and host Manchester United four days later. The Cottagers were always second best at the weekend against the in-form Saints, who could have won by more than first-half goals from Rickie Lambert and Jay Rodriguez. The 28-year-old managed to come through 81 minutes unscathed and hopes to be involved against the Foxes. He added: “I still have some problems with my back and we’re working on that. It’s getting better – hopefully in the next couple of weeks it will be 100 per cent.” Jol will also check on the fitness of captain Brede Hangeland, who missed out on Saturday with a nerve problem in his leg. Northern Ireland defender Aaron Hughes could start after coming on as a half-time substitute at St Mary’s following a month out with a thigh injury. He admitted: “We were very disappointed with the goals we conceded. We need to tighten up.” Bryan Ruiz admits Fulham need to quickly put their dismal 2-0 defeat at Southampton behind them as they prepare for another big week. Press Association And striker Ruiz knows they need to buck up their ideas if they are to avoid more disappointment, starting at the King Power Stadium. “Southampton played well,” Ruiz told the club’s official website. “We had a plan but once they scored the first goal it was difficult to find a way back into the match. They deserved the win but now we have to pick ourselves up and look towards the next match. “After winning two games in a row, we wanted to continue that at Southampton. We weren’t able to do it and we were all disappointed with the display. “The most frustrating thing was not testing their goalkeeper. We should have done more but Southampton have only conceded three goals this season and they’re very strong defensively. “They are in good shape and full of confidence but we need to try and forget about it now and concentrate on the next match. “We’ve got two games coming up quickly and it will be a tough week. We want to qualify for the next round of the cup and then take on Manchester United in a good frame of mind.” Costa Rica international Ruiz had to pass a late fitness test on his back injury in order to play at St Mary’s. last_img read more

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Ankle blow for Hughes

first_img Hughes, 34, injured his ankle in Brighton’s 3-2 defeat at Bournemouth at the weekend and is unlikely to feature in Bucharest on November 14. The centre-half has been ever present in his country’s best ever start to a major qualifying campaign – playing 90 minutes in successive wins over Hungary, the Faroe Islands and Greece. Fears of a broken ankle have been allayed and though he may yet appear in manager Michael O’Neill’s squad on Tuesday, it seems unlikely he will be fit to feature. Seagulls boss Sami Hyypia told the Argus: “There is nothing on the bone, so that’s a good thing. “If the bone was broken or something happened to the bone it would be a long process. “Now we are waiting for the swelling to go down. Then we will be able to assess it a little bit better. “If it’s ligament damage we are talking about weeks more than months I think. I’m not a doctor so I can’t really say how long and every individual heals in a different time frame.” The former Northern Ireland captain is currently on 93 caps, on track to become his country’s first ever outfield centurion. Press Associationcenter_img Defender Aaron Hughes is set to miss Northern Ireland’s Euro 2016 qualifier against Romania.last_img read more

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Update on the latest sports

first_imgBill Bartholomay, who moved Braves to Atlanta, dies at 91ATLANTA (AP) — Former Braves owner Bill Bartholomay has died at 91.Bartholomay moved the franchise from Milwaukee to Atlanta in 1966, making it the first Major League Baseball team in the South. He headed the group that sold the Braves to Ted Turner in 1976 but retained a partial interest and remained as the team’s chairman until November 2003, when he assumed an emeritus role.Braves Hall of Famer Hank Aaron said on his Twitter account that Bartholomay “was the greatest owner I ever had the pleasure to play for.”Bartholomay died Wednesday at New York-Presbyterian Hospital, according to his daughter, Jamie. Toy Cannon diesUNDATED (AP) — Jimmy Wynn, the diminutive slugger whose monster shots in the 1960s and ’70s earned him the popular nickname “The Toy Cannon,” has died at 78.The Astros said the three-time All-Star outfielder died Thursday in Houston, but the team did not provide further details.The 5-foot-9 Wynn hit more than 30 homers twice with Houston, including a career-high 37 in 1967 at the pitcher-friendly Astrodome. Wynn left the team as the franchise leader in hits, home runs, RBIs and walks. Overall, he finished with 291 homers with 964 RBIs and 225 stolen bases in his career.MLB-OBIT-BARTHOLOMAY March 26, 2020 — Former President Barack Obama was among more than 50,000 viewers who logged onto a coronavirus discussion between Golden State Warriors guard Stephen Curry and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. When Curry asked when it might be time to start thinking about sports again, Fauci responded, “when the country as a whole has turned that corner,” and the curve that shows how the virus is still spreading nationally starts coming down.— The Colorado Avalanche say one of their players has recovered after testing positive for the COVID-19 virus. The player was at home in isolation since the symptoms first appeared. The team says anyone who had known close contact with the player has been notified. The Avs issued a statement saying they continue to work in conjunction with their medical staff and public health officials to do everything they can to help the Avalanche community remain safe and healthy during this time.— NHL stars Alex Ovechkin (oh-VECH’-kin) and Sidney Crosby think the league should go directly to the playoffs once it resumes play. The two rival Metropolitan Division captains shared their views Thursday. Crosby says he understands the need to try to play as many games as possible. But he says he wouldn’t mind beginning with the playoffs. Ovechkin had the same idea. There is no timetable for when play will resume. It has not been determined whether the league will complete the regular season.— The WNBA has announced its draft will be a virtual event this season due to the coronavirus pandemic. The draft will be held on April 17 as originally scheduled but will be broadcast without players, fans or media in attendance. WNBA Commissioner Cathy Engelbert says the league is still looking at different scenarios for the start of the regular season but notes it could begin before the NBA resumes play.— Arsenal manager Mikel Arteta says he has fully recovered from the coronavirus, two weeks after testing positive for COVID-19. Arteta told the Arsenal website that he is “completely fine” and that he only felt ill for a few days. He said he had three or four days that were a little bit difficult, with a bit of a temperature, a dry cough and some discomfort in my chest.” Arteta became the first Premier League figure to test positive for the coronavirus on March 12. The league was then suspended the next day. UNDATED (AP) — The NCAA will distribute $225 million to its Division I members in June. That is $375 million less than had been budgeted this year because the coronavirus outbreak forced the cancellation of the men’s basketball tournament.The NCAA says $50 million will come from its reserve fund. A $270 million event cancellation insurance policy will help pay the rest.March Madness is among the biggest revenue producers for the NCAA and its schools. It was canceled March 19, a week before the first round was scheduled to begin.The NCAA pulled in more than $1 billion in revenue last year, including $867.5 million from the television and marketing rights for the Division I men’s basketball tournament.The NCAA had been scheduled to distribute $600 million to more than 300 Division I schools from April to June. — Hockey equipment manufacturer Bauer has shifted from making visors for helmets to medical visors for those fighting the coronavirus pandemic. Bauer faced the possibility of closing its manufacturing plant in Blainville, Quebec, when hockey came to a halt amid the global pandemic. But engineers there instead brainstormed the idea of producing medical shields to help protect people on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19.— A person with knowledge of the details tells The Associated Press that top NBA executives are having their base salaries reduced by 20% for the foreseeable future. The reductions affect the roughly 100 highest-earning executives, as the NBA joins the NHL and NASCAR in cutting salaries while competitions are on hold because of the coronavirus. The cuts are effective immediately and affect NBA employees both inside the league headquarters in New York and in global offices.— Hall of Fame jockey Javier Castellano says he has tested positive for the coronavirus and will be in quarantine for two weeks. Castellano tested positive as part of a physical that officials at Gulfstream Park mandated as a prerequisite before being cleared to ride in Saturday’s Florida Derby. Castellano says that he has not had “known contact with anyone that has tested positive.” Castellano last rode on March 15, when he had two mounts at Gulfstream.— New Orleans Saints quarterback Drew Brees says he and his wife, Brittany, are donating $5 million to help Louisiana businesses and communities contend with challenges brought on by the coronavirus outbreak in the state. Brees posted his pledge on a social media account and says the money will help several restaurants in which he has an ownership stake as well as a major hospital chain and charities that deliver meals to people in need.— The Green Bay Packers have extended the closure of Lambeau Field through at least April 24 to help minimize the spread of the coronavirus after Wisconsin Gov. Tony Evers issued a “safer at home” order through that date. Packers officials said the closure would continue until that order expires or until a superseding order is issued. Packers officials say Lambeau Field and Titletown will only have essential personnel in place for non-public operations of the facilities. Management was given the right to cut the amateur draft in both 2020 and 2021, and to freeze the values of signing bonus money at 2019 levels.Details were divulged to The Associated Press by a person familiar with the agreement who spoke on condition of anonymity because no announcement was made.Teams are set to approve the roughly 17-page agreement Friday, the person said.NCAA-REVENUE DISTRIBUTIONPandemic fallout: NCAA slashes distribution by $375 million — The International Olympic Committee says it is “not aware of any link” between an Olympic boxing tournament it oversaw in London this month and positive coronavirus tests for people who were there. The Turkish boxing federation says a boxer and a trainer now have the virus after attending the Olympic qualifying tournament, which was stopped on March 16 after three of the scheduled 11 days. The Turkish team says the two men are being treated in a hospital and two others with symptoms are awaiting test results.MLB-SERVICE TIMEPlayers, management agree to preserve service timeUNDATED (AP) — Players have agreed to a deal with Major League Baseball that would preserve service time in the event this season is canceled because of the coronavirus pandemic. However, the two sides have left open details of what a configured schedule would look like.As part of the agreement approved by the union Thursday night, players agreed not to challenge giving up their salaries if no games are played, except for $170 million payment management will advance in two stages. Player salary this year is expected to be in the $4 billion range.center_img The Indianapolis 500 scheduled for May 24 has been postponed until August because of the coronavirus pandemic.It will be the first time since 1946 that the race won’t be run on Memorial Day weekend.IndyCar initially said it would resume racing May 9 on the road course at Indianapolis. That race will now be run on July 4, a day before NASCAR races at The Brickyard. The Indy 500 will be moved to Aug. 23.In other outbreak-related developments:— The company that manufactures uniforms for Major League Baseball, has suspended production on jerseys and is instead using the polyester mesh fabric to make masks and gowns for hospitals in Pennsylvania and nearby states. Fanatics founder and executive chairman was watching TV last week when he was struck by the idea to turn the 360,000-square foot facility in Easton, Pennsylvania, into a factory for the COVID-19 virus fight. St. Luke’s Hospital in nearby Bethlehem reached out to Fanatics late last week about the possibility of the company manufacturing masks. Update on the latest sports Associated Press Share This StoryFacebookTwitteremailPrintLinkedinRedditVIRUS OUTBREAK-SPORTSIndy 500 moved to AugustUNDATED (AP) — The Brickyard will be silent Memorial Day weekend. COLLEGE BASKETBALL-VANDERBILLT-NESMITHNesmith leaving CommodoresNASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Vanderbilt guard Aaron Nesmith is forgoing his final two seasons of eligibility to enter the NBA draft.Nesmith was one of the nation’s most prolific scorers and 3-point shooters before a right foot injury caused him to miss more than half the season. He averaged 23 points, 4.9 rebounds and 1.4 steals for the Commodores this past season.MLB-OBIT-WYNN OBIT-GLOBETROTTERS-NEALHarlem Globetrotters great Curly Neal dies at 77UNDATED (AP) — Iconic Harlem Globetrotters player Fred “Curly” Neal has died at 77, according to the team.The dribbling wizard played for the Globetrotters from 1963-85, appearing in more than 6,000 games in 97 countries for the exhibition team known for its combination of comedy and athleticism. He became one of five Globetrotters to have his jersey retired when his No. 22 was lifted to the rafters during a special ceremony at Madison Square Garden in 2008.Neal was a crowd favorite with his trademark shaved head, infectious smile and ability to dribble circles around would-be defenders.,Tampa Bay Lightning advance to face Dallas Stars in Stanley Cup finals, beating New York Islanders 2-1 in OT in Game 6last_img read more

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