Cottrell lands WI retainer

first_imgST JOHN’S, Antigua (CMC):Batsman Leon Johnson and left-arm pacer Sheldon Cottrell have both been handed retainer contracts by the West Indies Cricket Board, despite not featuring for the regional side over the last year.The pair are among a list of 15 players announced by the WICB late yesterday who have been retained for the period beginning last October 1 to September 30 later this year.Johnson, a 28-year-old left-hander, has been repeatedly overlooked in recent months despite the West Indies’ continued struggles at the top of the order.He averages nearly 40 in his four Tests and gathered scores of 54 and 44 in his last Test – against South Africa in Cape Town last January.Fellow Guyanese Rajindra Chandrika has been the preferred choice despite three noughts in six Test innings and an average of 14.Cottrell, meanwhile, has not suited up for West Indies since the one-day series in South Africa last January.The 26-year-old has struggled with injury this year and only recent resumed bowling when he turned out for Jamaica Scorpions in the Regional First Class Championship.He played the last of this two Tests in December, 2014, and has played two one-day internationals.Marlon Samuels has been also retained despite a torrid time with the bat in recent months. The Jamaican gathered 30 runs from four Test innings against Sri Lanka last October and managed only 35 runs in five outings against Australia in the just concluded three-Test series Down Under.Rookies Shai Hope and Shane Dowrich, who like Chandrika both made their Test debuts last year, are also among the 15 retained.RETAINED PLAYERS – Jason Holder, Kraigg Brathwaite, Rajendra Chandrika, Darren Bravo, Marlon Samuels, Denesh Ramdin, Devendra Bishoo, Shannon Gabriel, Jermaine Blackwood, Jerome Taylor, Sheldon Cottrell, Shai Hope, Shane Dowrich, Leon Johnson, Kemar Roach.last_img read more

Read More →

Hewitt bows out

first_imgMELBOURNE, Australia (AP):Baseball cap turned backward, pumping himself up with cries of “C’MON!” Lleyton Hewitt fought one last feisty encounter. Then he gathered his three young kids on centre court and said farewell.After a career spent trying to win the Australian Open, the 34-year-old Hewitt had said that this year’s tournament – his 20th attempt – would be his last.”Lleyton’s Last Stand”, as some Australian media have billed it, came yesterday in the second round, where Hewitt lost to David Ferrer, 6-2, 6-4, 6-4, in a gritty contest that the numbers alone don’t do justice. It included some dramatic tennis, a few expletives – including a verbal volley Hewitt had with the chair umpire – and was capped off by an emotional send-off in the Rod Laver Arena.When the No. 8-ranked Ferrer returned to the court for the winner’s customary post-match interview, he redirected the spotlight to Hewitt.Ferrer, who at 33 is just a year younger than Hewitt and has a similar relentless, chase-every-ball style, told the crowd that he once had Hewitt sign a T-shirt for him that now hangs with other tennis memorabilia in his home. “I never had idols, but Lleyton is an idol for me.”last_img read more

Read More →

Planning a training programme

first_imgA training programme is designed to improve fitness, sharpen skills and encourage team work. Many sports are seasonal, therefore the programme is divided into parts called periodisation. Some sports use three main periods: 1. Preseason – Focus on a high level of general fitness for the particular sport. – Concentrate on muscular endurance, power and speed work. – Development of techniques, skills and strategies for the particular sport. 2. Competitive/Peak season – Emphasise speed. – Practise skills at high speed and competitive situations (training circuits and practise matches). – Extra fitness sessions for strength and power for key muscles. – Adequate recovery and rest to avoid injury and fatigue. 3. Off Season – Aims for complete recovery from competition through rest, relaxation and other sports (active rest) to maintain a level of fitness. The training programme can be long-term or short and designed for a particular sport, specific level of ability, an individual sports person or group of sports people at a similar level of ability. The skill requirements, type of fitness needed, demographics (age, health, experience, etc) must be considered. The training principles, including the FITT principle and training methods, must be incorporated in planning training programmes. The components of a training session. Having decided on the programme of training, the actual training session should have three parts: 1. Warm-up The warm-up helps with mental preparation, increases heart rate and blood flow, warm muscles, loosen joints, increases flexibility and reduces the risk of injury to muscles and joints. The warm-ups must last at least 20-30 minutes and should include: – Gentle exercise for the whole body, such as jogging. – Gentle stretching to increase range of movement at the joints and prevent strains on muscles tendons and ligaments. Each stretch must be held for 10-30 seconds with no bouncing. – Specific warm-up for the activity, e.g., minor game passing the ball around. 2. Training activities This is the body of the training session and prepares the individual or team in different ways for fitness and skill development, depending on the demand of the particular sport. The training activity should include the following: – Physical preparation A fitness session, e.g., continuous, fartlek, interval or circuit training – Psychological preparation Players need a certain intensity of motivation called arousal, which aids performance. If the arousal level is not high enough, boredom sets in and performance declines. Anxiety, stress level and aggression must also be managed. The team psychiatrist will help the players to recognise and manage these problems. – Technical preparation These are the basic patterns of movement which have to be developed in every activity. Skilful performance is the product of using techniques correctly, e.g., a netball player may work through a series of practices designed to improve footwork skills. – Tactical preparation How the opponent is beaten will depend on a number of different factors. Therefore, in order to win, a tactical game plan is needed. The main tactic for most sport involves either attack or defence. The basic principles behind these should be done during the session. For example, corner or free kicks can be done by using drills and practices for each situation. 3. Cool down The cool down is where the body recovers after vigorous activity and is as important as the warm-up. It prevents soreness, keeps circulation up so that more oxygen reaches the muscles to clear away lactic acid, and loosens tight muscles to prevent stiffness later. The cool down must begin with a few minutes of jogging, then finishing with stretching exercises. Special attention must be given to the main joints used. Recovery rate is how quickly the body gets back to normal. Make sure enough time is given to recover between training sessions. If training is done every day, follow a heavy one-day session with a light session. During a heavy training period, at least one rest day must be taken per week.last_img read more

Read More →

Minister tapping into business of sports

first_imgSports Minister Olivia ‘Babsy’ Grange says her ministry will be looking to pick up on a feasibility study conducted in partnership with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in 2007 in an effort to make sports a serious foreign-currency earner.In an interview with The Gleaner following welcome home celebrations for the island’s teams to the Carifta swimming and track and field championships, at the VIP Lounge at the Norman Manley International Airport earlier this week, the minister outlined that she hopes to market Jamaica as a sports tourism destination and training facility.”When I became minister in 2007, I had submitted a proposal to UNESCO to do a pre-feasibility study on Jamaica as a training facility for various sporting disciplines. That pre-feasibility study was funded and was actually done by someone from the University of Technology (UTech). The results were submitted to UNESCO and they were about to fund the feasibility study when we demitted office; and so we are gonna pick up where we left off, because I know that Jamaica is a brand and we should exploit that brand,” she outlined.”We can be that training facility, we can be the centre of sports tourism, the centre of culture tourism and we can be the centre of a creative industry, where Jamaica can say to the world, here we have the facilities. We have the infrastructure and we have the people with the skills to be able to provide what you need. Come to Jamaica,” she pointed out.last_img read more

Read More →